aspirate


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Related to aspirate: aspiration pneumonia

aspirate

 [as´pĭ-rāt]
1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction; see aspiration (def. 3).
2. the fluid withdrawn this way.

as·pi·rate

(as'pi-rāt),
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, give the H sound]

aspirate

(ăs′pə-rāt′)
tr.v. aspi·rated, aspi·rating, aspi·rates
1. To draw (liquid or a foreign object, for example) into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
2. Medicine
a. To remove (a liquid or gas) from the body by aspiration.
b. To suction (a body part or growth, for example) for the removal of a liquid or gas.
n. (-pər-ĭt)
Medicine Matter removed by aspiration.

aspirate

[-rāt]
Etymology: L, aspirare, to breathe upon
1 to withdraw fluid or air from a cavity. The process is usually aided by use of a syringe or a suction device. See paracentesis, thoracentesis.
2 when all or part of a food/liquid bolus enters the airway.
3 (in phonetics) a release of air.

aspirate

Lab medicine
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for transport to the lab (e.g., syringe), or analysis (as in a lab instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyser). 

Orthopaedics
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure from a joint—e.g., to reduce intra-articular pressure.

Respiratory medicine
noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst.

verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia.

aspirate

To suck in Chest medicine noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia Clinical medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure from a joint–eg, to ↓ pressure Lab medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for storage—eg syringe, or for analysis—as in a laboratory instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyzer

as·pi·rate

1. (as'pi-rāt) To remove by aspiration.
2. (as'pi-rit) The substance removed by aspiration.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

Aspirate

The removal by suction of a fluid from a body cavity using a needle.

as·pi·rate

(as'pir-āt)
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

aspirate (as´pirāt),

v 1. to draw or breathe in.
v 2. to remove materials by vacuum.
n 3. a phonetic unit whose identifying characteristic is the sound generated by the passage of air through a relatively open channel; the sound of
h; a sound followed by or combined with the sound of
h.
Enlarge picture
Aspergillosis.

aspirate

1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction.
2. the fluid obtained by aspiration.

Patient discussion about aspirate

Q. What Causes Aspiration Pneumonia? My father is hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia. What causes this?

A. Aspiration pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign material that enter the bronchial tree (air tubes), usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). Aspiration pneumonia represents a either a bacterial infection or a chemical inflammatory process due to inadequate swallowing mechanism.

More discussions about aspirate
References in periodicals archive ?
pH and concentration of bilirubin in feeding tube aspirates as predictors of tube placement.
appearance of aspirate observed during residual volume measurements
After careful review of the literature and in light of the limitations noted above, it is clear that while no single method to check placement is applicable in every situation, aspirate pH should be used as a primary method rather than relying on auscultation alone.
7 of the 11 cases of suspected pure neuritic leprosy showed multiple AFB in the nerve aspirate.
The uniqueness, ease of use and clinical advantages open up the autologous orthobiologic market to many specialty physicians, such as Podiatrists, who currently do not utilize autologous bone marrow aspirate concentrate.
Incremental yield of aspirate was calculated for patients who had collection for sputum and either lymph node or pleural fluid aspirate.
Of the 24 cases with a positive diagnosis on the aspirate smears, 23 had a concurrent cell block.
6] These parasite has been detected in bone marrow, lymph node aspirates, most being benign lesions with only few malignant cases.
Diagnostic criteria of each disease are further emphasized and highlighted in a tabulated bulleted format, which makes them ideal for the quick read you may need during immediate evaluation of an aspirate.
The BMAC[TM] (Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate) System is currently being used in Europe to treat vascular, orthopedic and cardiovascular diseases.
The reports of pleural fluid analysis, the bronchial aspirate cytology, endobronchial biopsy and post-scopy sputum examination were analyzed thoroughly.