asphyxia


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asphyxia

 [as-fik´se-ah]
pathological changes caused by lack of oxygen in respired air, resulting in a deficiency of oxygen in the blood (hypoxia) and an increase in carbon dioxide in the blood and tissues (hypercapnia). Symptoms include irregular and disturbed respirations, or a complete absence of breathing, and pallor or cyanosis. Asphyxia may occur whenever there is an interruption in the normal exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and the outside air. Some common causes are drowning, electric shock, hanging, suffocation, lodging of a foreign body in the air passages, inhalation of smoke and poisonous gases, and trauma to or disease of the lungs or air passages. Treatment includes immediate remedy of the situation by artificial respiration and removal of the underlying cause whenever possible. See also suffocation. adj., adj asphyx´�ial, asphyx´iant.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă),
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

(ăs-fĭk′sē-ə)
n.
A condition in which an extreme decrease in the concentration of oxygen in the body accompanied by an increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide leads to loss of consciousness or death. Asphyxia can be induced by choking, drowning, electric shock, injury, or the inhalation of toxic gases.

asphyxia

Physiology
1. Impaired breathing.
2. A pathological state caused by the inadequate intake of O2, with accumulation of CO2 and hypoxia. See Autoerotic asphyxia, Sexual asphyxia.

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impairment of ventilatory exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide; combined hypercapnia, hypoxia, or anoxia; causes death if not corrected.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]

asphyxia

Suffocation by interference with the free AIRWAY between the atmosphere and the air sacs in the lungs. Asphyxia is usually the cause of death in drowning, choking, strangling, inhalation of a gas which excludes oxygen, foreign body airway obstruction and OEDEMA of the LARYNX.

asphyxia

suffocation, lack of oxygen.

Asphyxia

Lack of oxygen. In the case of cerebral palsy, lack of oxygen to the brain.
Mentioned in: Cerebral Palsy

as·phyx·i·a

(as-fik'sē-ă)
Impaired or absent exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide on a ventilatory basis; combined hypercapnia and hypoxia or anoxia.
[G. a- priv. + sphyzō, to throb]
References in periodicals archive ?
Outcome of perinatal asphyxia can be altered by timely diagnosis and resuscitation.
In newborns with birth asphyxia, institutions of early measures for prompt diagnosis and management should be ensured to improve the outcome.
Good supportive care is essential in the first 72 hours after asphyxia to prevent ongoing brain injury in the penumbra region.
In the literature, some mechanisms have been put forward to explain the link between perinatal asphyxia and SCFNN.
The results were compared with those of neonates with asphyxia. The indices were detected again two weeks later.
On the other hand, three babies born at the hospital had severe birth asphyxia, while one had a meconium aspiration syndrome.
In his report at the time, Dr Woodcock said there was evidence of asphyxia and recorded a cause of death as suffocation by pressure on the face and neck.
[7] observed that investments towards establishing robust health information systems to capture the magnitude of birth asphyxia in most African countries had lagged.
Perinatal asphyxia is the major and serious cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates globally.10 WHO reported in 2000 that out of 130 million neonates born globally per year, estimately 4 million neonates die under one month of the age, and it has been shown that 99% of these deaths of neonates occur in developing nations, perinatal asphyxia contributes to almost 23% of these deaths.10 Padayachee N et al11 reported that out of 450 infants 41.1% were females and mean of the gestational age was 39.12.2 weeks, these finding are comparable with our results as male were in higher number i.e.
Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is an obstetric complication derived from impaired gas exchange [7] resulting in progressive hypercapnia and hypoxemia if unattended.
Information about the birth asphyxia, seizures as well as preterm delivery was noted.