aspartame


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Related to aspartame: Acesulfame potassium

aspartame

 [ah-spar´tām]
a synthetic compound of two amino acids, used as a low-calorie sweetener. It is 180 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar); the amount equal in sweetness to a teaspoon of sugar contains 0.1 calorie. Aspartame does not promote the formation of dental caries. The amount of phenylalanine it contains must be taken into account in the low-phenylalanine diet of patients with phenylketonuria.

aspartame

/as·par·tame/ (ah-spahr´tām) (as´pahr-tām″) an artificial sweetener about 200 times as sweet as sucrose and used as a low-calorie sweetener.

aspartame

(ăs′pər-tām′, ə-spär′-)
n.
An artificial sweetener, C14H18N2O5, whose metabolic breakdown products include aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It must be avoided by people with phenylketonuria.

aspartame

[aspär′tām, as′pərtām]
a white, almost odorless crystalline powder that is used as an artificial sweetener. It is formed by binding the amino acids of phenylalanine and aspartic acid. Approximately 180 times as sweet as the same amount of sucrose, it is used mostly to sweeten cold or uncooked foods. Unprotected aspartame tends to lose its sweetness in the presence of heat, moisture, and alkaline media. Excessive use of this nonnutritive sweetener should be avoided by patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) because the substance hydrolyzes to form aspartate and phenylalanine.
An artificial sweetener that is a dipeptide ester of aspartic acid and phenylalanine, which was discovered in 1965 and approved by the FDA in 1983; it may be safer than saccharin except in patients with phenylketonuria
Adverse reactions Rare, with large amounts—mild depression, headaches, insomnia, loss of motor control, nausea, seizures, and possibly brain cancer

aspartame

Nutrasweet® An artificial sweetener/ester of aspartic acid and phenylalanine; it may be safer than saccharin except in Pts with phenylketonuria Adverse reactions Rare, with large amounts–mild depression, headaches, insomnia, loss of motor control, nausea, seizures, etc, and possibly brain cancer. See Artificial sweeteners. Cf Aspartate, Cyclamate.

aspartame

An artificial sweetener derived from aspartic acid and phenylalanine.

as·par·tame

(aspĕr-tām)
Methyl-aspartylphenylalanine, a synthetic dipeptide with a high sweetness index but very low caloric content used as an artificial sweetner for some foods and beverages.

aspartame (as´pərtām),

n brand name: NutriSweet, a low-calorie sweetening agent about 200 times as sweet as sucrose.

aspartame

a synthetic compound of two amino acids (l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine o-methyl ester) used as sweetener in low-calorie drinks. It is 180 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar); the amount equal in sweetness to a teaspoon of sugar contains 0.1 calorie.
References in periodicals archive ?
The molecule of MBTE happens to come from methanol, the same chemical produced by aspartame.
A 2007 review of more than 500 academic studies into the safety of aspartame found the sweetener posed no health risks.
In 2008, the ADA began this in-depth analysis of a list of questions about aspartame using its "evidence analysis" approach, which systematically and rigorously evaluates relevant human studies that fall within specific, pre-determined parameters.
Aspartame was discovered in 1965; it took 17 years to be approved for consumption by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1981 (Stengik, 1987), and 29 years for its approval by the European Union, in 1994 (ABIAD, 1994).
Concluding that taking aspartame causes eye problems with this data is no different from concluding it causes hiccups because one of your subjects contracted them during the study.
In the new study, the investigators added aspartame to the standard diets of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats from the twelfth day of fetal life until natural death.
Antes de la aprobacion, la FDA reviso numerosos estudios que demostraban que el aspartame no causa cancer u otros efectos nocivos en animales de laboratorio.
Aspartame, sold under the brand names Equal and NutraSweet, is used in thousands of products, including diet soft drinks and sugarfree gum.
Roger Williams, MP for Brecon and Radnor, used parliamentary privilege to raise serious concerns about the safety of aspartame last week.
Diet soda contains: carbonated water, caramel color, aspartame (NutraSweet) or sucralose (Splenda), phosphoric acid, potassium benzoate (to protect taste), natural flavors, citric acid and caffeine.
and a former employee reached a court-mediated settlement Friday of a dispute over the transfer of patents on the production method for the artificial sweetener aspartame, the company said.
Aspartame is made from things which occur in larger quantities in other parts of our diet, and our bodies digest it completely naturally.