aspartame


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Related to aspartame: Acesulfame potassium

aspartame

 [ah-spar´tām]
a synthetic compound of two amino acids, used as a low-calorie sweetener. It is 180 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar); the amount equal in sweetness to a teaspoon of sugar contains 0.1 calorie. Aspartame does not promote the formation of dental caries. The amount of phenylalanine it contains must be taken into account in the low-phenylalanine diet of patients with phenylketonuria.

aspartame

(ăs′pər-tām′, ə-spär′-)
n.
An artificial sweetener, C14H18N2O5, whose metabolic breakdown products include aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It must be avoided by people with phenylketonuria.
An artificial sweetener that is a dipeptide ester of aspartic acid and phenylalanine, which was discovered in 1965 and approved by the FDA in 1983; it may be safer than saccharin except in patients with phenylketonuria
Adverse reactions Rare, with large amounts—mild depression, headaches, insomnia, loss of motor control, nausea, seizures, and possibly brain cancer

aspartame

Nutrasweet® An artificial sweetener/ester of aspartic acid and phenylalanine; it may be safer than saccharin except in Pts with phenylketonuria Adverse reactions Rare, with large amounts–mild depression, headaches, insomnia, loss of motor control, nausea, seizures, etc, and possibly brain cancer. See Artificial sweeteners. Cf Aspartate, Cyclamate.

aspartame

An artificial sweetener derived from aspartic acid and phenylalanine.

as·par·tame

(aspĕr-tām)
Methyl-aspartylphenylalanine, a synthetic dipeptide with a high sweetness index but very low caloric content used as an artificial sweetner for some foods and beverages.
References in periodicals archive ?
"This research adds weight to the argument that authorisation to sell or use aspartame should be suspended throughout the EU, including in the UK, pending a thorough re-examination of all the evidence by a reconvened EFSA that is able to satisfy critics and the public that they operate in a fully transparent and accountable manner applying a fair and consistent approach to evaluation and decision making."
However, the most commonly used sugar substitute aspartame - the sweet silent killer, a major culprit of many diseases, and fatal conditions - is most commonly ignored.
"Classic sweetener blend" is vague at best, and avoids providing key information about aspartame, especially when an ingredient list is not accessible without breaking open the box.
Diet Coke contains aspartame. PepsiCo's net revenue fell 3 percent in the first quarter, while Coca-Cola's fell 4 percent.
Upon ingestion approximately 50% of the aspartame molecule is phenylalanine, 40% is aspartic acid and 10% is methanol [3].
2.5 ml of this liquid culture was added in two 5ml of Brain Heart Infusion Broths with sucrose, congo red and sterile human tooth one with 0.3% aspartame and other without aspartame and incubated at 37 [degrees]C with 10% C[O.sub.2] for 18 hrs.
"This opinion represents one of the most comprehensive risk assessments of aspartame ever undertaken.
Aspartame and its breakdown products are safe for human consumption at current levels of exposure, according to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which concluded its first full risk assessment of the sweetener.
The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published, on 10 December, its final opinion on the risks associated with aspartame. As it said in a provisional opinion one year ago, it considers that aspartame and its breakdown productsaare safe for human consumption at current levels of exposure.
The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published, on 10 December, its final opinion on the risks associated with aspartame. As it said in a provisional opinion one year ago (see Europolitics 4628), it considers that aspartame and its breakdown productsaare safe for human consumption at current levels of exposure.
Summary: A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method for the successful separation and determination of 6 synthetic food additives (aspartame, acesulfame potassium, benzoic acid, sodium saccharin, tartrazine and sunset yellow) was developed.