asexuality


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asexuality

See asexual.

a·sex·u·al·i·ty

(ā'sek'shū-al'i-tē)
The condition of lacking sex, sexually functioning organs, or sexal orientation.

asexual

(a?sek'shu-al) [ ¹an- + sexual]
1. Lacking sex organs or functional sex organs.
2. Produced or reproduced without sex.
Synonym: agamicasexuality (shu-al'it-e) asexually
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References in periodicals archive ?
A pond of asexual Daphnia may go extinct quite rapidly owing to these deleterious gene-exposing processes, but the small chromosomal regions responsible for asexuality survive by jumping to new sexual populations where they again transform the local individuals to asexuality by repeated backcrossing," explains Lynch.
Asexuality has thus far received no attention in the legal
This idea that people ascend into asexuality as they age is not only unrealistic, but also often detrimental to the overall well-being of countless older adults.
Ninety-nine per cent of the bad responses that I've had about my asexuality have come from potential dates when I was trying 'mainstream dating'.
Major essays in this volume advance our understanding of the possibilities present in non-solidified categories, such as gender identities formed by Thai women living in urban dormitories, or the increasingly expansive de-medicalized understanding of asexuality.
These attractions are generally subsumed under heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality, and asexuality.
Castellanos's letters to her ex-husband Ricardo Guerra, her plays and the novel Oficio de tinieblas, provide Hind with evidence of repressive selfpolicing and self-imposed asexuality.
Gendered stereotypes focus on asexuality or an overdeveloped interest in sex.
While Groner's conclusions about the "queerness" of these narratives is compelling, her tendency to sexualize her subjects' "disavowal of sexuality," along with her argument that "people with ASD are neither asexual nor asensual," (273) seems to exist in tension with the insights of asexuality studies.
These include transgenderism, transsexualism, transvestism, bigenderism, genderqueerism, homosexuality, bisexuality, pansexuality, polysexuality and asexuality, to name a few.
Moreover, asexual women suffered a later menarche, which lead Bogaert to propose that there can be both psychosocial and biological paths that lead to asexuality.
Certainly, no young man wants a diminished manhood and Shakespeare's dramatic recreation reiterates an obvious point: stand up and fight to avoid the label of substandard male, that is, an individual devoid of strength, reduced to asexuality, rendered into a nondescript, eunuchal mush.