asepsis


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Related to asepsis: surgical asepsis

asepsis

 [a-sep´sis]
1. freedom from infection or infectious material.
2. the absence of viable pathogenic organisms; see also aseptic technique. adj., adj asep´tic.(See accompanying table.)
medical asepsis the use of practices aimed at destroying pathological organisms after they leave the body; employed in the care of patients with infectious diseases to prevent reinfection of the patient and to avoid the spread of infection from one person to another. This is achieved by isolation precautions, in which the objects in the patient's environment are protected from contamination or disinfected as soon as possible after contamination.
surgical asepsis the exclusion of all microorganisms before they can enter an open surgical wound or contaminate a sterile field during surgery. See accompanying table. Measures taken include sterilization of all instruments, drapes, and all other inanimate objects that may come in contact with the surgical wound. All personnel coming in contact with the sterile field perform a surgical hand scrub with an antimicrobial agent and put on a surgical gown and gloves. Further information concerning aseptic technique and technical aspects of perioperative nursing practice can be found in the publication AORN Standards, Recommended Practices, and Guidelines, published by AORN, the Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses.

a·sep·sis

(ă-sep'sis, ā-),
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility (2).
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis

(ə-sĕp′sĭs, ā-)
n.
1. The state of being free of pathogenic microorganisms.
2. The process of removing pathogenic microorganisms or protecting against infection by such organisms.

a·sep·sis

(ā-sep'sis)
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility (q.v.).
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis

The complete absence of all bacteria or other microorganisms capable of causing infection. Asepsis, as distinct from antisepsis, is the concept that made modern surgery possible.

a·sep·sis

(ā-sep'sis)
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility.
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]
References in periodicals archive ?
Errors such as failing to comply with sterility and asepsis rules; wrong identification of patient identity; and administrating wrong dosage of medications were overwhelmingly made by students during invasive interventions made at clinics and in their first years when they are inexperienced.
Attention to strict asepsis when preparing the dialysis circuit, bacterial quality of the dialysate, characteristics of the dialyzer used, and individual physiological response to the presence of endotoxins all play a part in whether individuals being dialyzed experience a pyrogenic response.
He incorporated several practices from the method of cleanliness, and it has been said that the practise which resulted from this compromise, known today as asepsis, seems to have more in common with the method of cleanliness than antisepsis (Granshaw 1992).
Towards the end of the 19th century, improvements in anaesthesia and asepsis allowed surgeons to contemplate operations in previously inaccessible areas.
"Our lecturers were mostly doctors and so we learnt anatomy and physiology very well, medical history, pharmacology, nutrition, microbiology, the principles of asepsis and so on.
They found two to three times higher air and surface bacterial counts in the areas important for surgical asepsis in an operating room with displacement ventilation at 17 ach.
On the ground floor, by contrast, whiteness and asepsis reigned, in fragmentary images of bodies or of nature.
Several of the companies attending Arab Health have developed technology to support medicine in its progress: laboratory equipment, ever more accurate and efficient diagnostics devices, as well as solutions to improve medical environments: asepsis, antisepsis, sterilisation, the preservation of human samples and medicine using genuine cold chain logistics and more.
Each procedure was performed using alcohol 70% for skin asepsis and lidocaine 4% for local anesthesia.
The programme currently covers blood glucose management, resuscitation, asepsis and haemorrhage management, but Animmersion is keen to expand it to cover about 20 procedures over the next six months.