ramus

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ramus

 [ra´mus] (L.)
ramus commu´nicans (pl. ra´mi communican´tes), a branch connecting two nerves or two arteries.
ramus of mandible a quadrilateral process projecting upwards from the posterior part of either side of the mandible.

ra·mus

, pl.

ra·mi

(rā'mŭs, rā'mī), [TA]
1. Synonym(s): branch
2. One of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel. Arterial and nerve branches are also given under the major nerve or artery.
3. A part of an irregularly shaped bone (less slender than a "process") that forms an angle with the main body (for example, ramus of mandible).
4. One of the primary divisions of a cerebral sulcus.
[L.]

ramus

(rā′məs)
n. pl. ra·mi (-mī′)
1. A branch, as of a nerve or blood vessel, or a projecting part, as of a rotifer or crustacean.
2. A bony process extending like a branch from a larger bone, especially the ascending part of the lower jaw that makes a joint at the temple.

ra·mus

, pl. rami (rā'mŭs, -mī)
1. [TA]
Synonym(s): branch.
2. One of the primary divisions of a nerve or blood vessel.
See also: artery, nerve
3. A part of an irregularly shaped bone (less slender than a "process") that forms an angle with the main body (e.g., ramus of mandible).
4. One of the primary divisions of a cerebral sulcus.
[L.]

ramus

A branch or subdivision arising from the division (bifurcation) of a blood or lymphatic vessel or a nerve.

ramus

a branch.

ra·mus

, pl. rami (rā'mŭs, -mī)
1. Synonym(s): branch.
2. A primary division of a nerve or blood vessel.
3. A part of an irregularly shaped bone that forms an angle with the main body.
4. A primary division of a cerebral sulcus.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
For each QTL, traits were cross-classified as being significantly affected (1) or not (0) and as representing either the alveolar (1) or ascending ramus (0) region of the mandible, as specified in Table 1.
Of the 26 QTLs affecting more than two traits, seven (27%) are significantly associated with the general contrast of alveolar versus ascending ramus traits.
According to a meta - analysis, 63 cases were reported from 1927-2003, the various sites of the mandible in relation with frequency in the descending manner shows 30.5% lesions in the posterior body of the mandible, 28.5% in the condyle, 14.2% in the angle, 11.1% in the ascending ramus, 7.9% in the coronoid process, 6.3% in the anterior body and 1.5% in the sigmoid notch.1 There are no reports of Osteomas undergoing malignant transformation.
Peripheral osteoma of the mandibular ascending ramus. J Oral Maxillofac Surg.
Among the different causes of mandibular 3rd molar impaction, space deficiency is considered the most important and common cause.13 Lack of space in the alveolar arch between the distal of the second molar and the ascending ramus, result in impaction.14 Bjork et al noted that in cases of mandibular third molar impaction, the alveolar arch space behind the second molar was reduced in 90 percent of cases.7,8 Provision of adequate space is associated with mandibular growth.
Patient was operated under local anesthesia, extended third molar incision extending along the buccal sulcus--35,36,37,38 regions (Figure 3) posteriorly beyond the external oblique ridge & ascending ramus.
The results of many previous studies also support the results.7, 8 Contrary to present study class IIB was most common type in Spanish population 13 and also in few other studies.15, 21 This may be due to low correlation between the maxillofacial skeletal development and maturation of third molars resulting in reduced arch length between second molars and ascending ramus.
Where the dentist places the thumb intra-orally at the deepest concavity of the anterior ascending ramus and the index finger at the same height extra-orally on the posterior aspect of the ramus.
The gonial angle is formed by the line tangent to the lower border of the mandible and the line tangent to the distal border of the ascending ramus and condyle.11,20 The shape of the mandibular base, especially the gonial angle, correlates with the function and shape of the muscles of mastication.21 With age, the masticatory muscles change in function and structure, seen in decreased contractile activity and lower muscle density.22 Some studies have shown a gender difference.11,23

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