limb

(redirected from ascending limb)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

limb

 [lim]
1. one of the paired appendages of the body used in locomotion and grasping; see arm and leg. Called also member, membrum, and extremity.
2. a structure or part resembling an arm or leg.
anacrotic limb ascending limb (def. 2).
artificial limb a replacement for a missing limb; see also prosthesis.
ascending limb
1. the distal part of Henle's loop.
2. the ascending portion of an arterial pulse tracing; called also anacrotic limb.
catacrotic limb descending limb (def. 2).
descending limb
1. the proximal part of Henle's loop.
2. the descending portion of an arterial pulse tracing; called also catacrotic limb.
lower limb the limb of the body extending from the gluteal region to the foot; it is specialized for weight-bearing and locomotion. See also leg.
pectoral limb the arm (upper limb), or a homologous part.
pelvic limb the leg (lower limb), or a homologous part.
phantom limb the sensation, after amputation of a limb, that the absent part is still present; there may also be paresthesias, transient aches, and intermittent or continuous pain perceived as originating in the absent limb.
residual limb stump.
thoracic limb pectoral limb.
upper limb the limb of the body extending from the deltoid region to the hand; it is specialized for functions requiring great mobility, such as grasping and manipulating. See also arm.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

limb

(lim), [TA]
1. An extremity; a member; an arm (upper extremity) or leg (lower extremity).
See also: leg, crus. Synonym(s): member
2. A segment of any jointed structure.
See also: leg, crus.
[A.S. lim]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

limb

(lĭm)
n.
1. One of the paired jointed extremities of the body; an arm or a leg.
2. A segment of such a jointed structure.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

limb

The arm or leg. See Parasitic limb.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

limb

(lim) [TA]
1. An extremity; a member; an arm or leg.
Synonym(s): member.
2. A segment of any jointed structure.
See also: leg
[A.S. lim]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

limb

  1. an articulated projection from the body of an animal, such as a leg or wing which is used for locomotion.
  2. a branch of a tree.
  3. the flattened part of a calyx or corolla where the base is tubular.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

limb

(lim) [TA]
1. An extremity; a member; an arm (upper extremity) or leg (lower extremity).
2. A segment of any jointed structure.
[A.S. lim]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
PCT: proximal convoluted tubule; DCT: distal convoluted tubule; CCD: cortical collecting duct; Pcap: peritubular capillary; TALH: thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle; MCD: medullary collecting duct; VR: vasa recta; tLH: thin limb of the loop of Henle (n = 5/group).
Furthermore, immunohistochemical study confirms that there was an increase in NKCC2 expression at apical plasma membrane domains of thick ascending limb cells of BUO compared to sham-operated rats.
et al., "Transport defects of rabbit medullary thick ascending limb cells in obstructive nephropathy," The Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol.
Stimulation on the ascending limb was related to drinking in the past month for African Americans but not for whites.
Leptospirosis associated with hypokalaemia and thick ascending limb dysfunction [In Process Citation].
Leptospira outer membrane protein activates NF-kappaB and downstream genes expressed in medullary thick ascending limb cells.
As tubular fluid moves into the thick ascending limb, more [Na.sup.+] and [C1.sup.-] than water has been reabsorbed leading to a relatively lower ion concentration and osmolality compared to plasma.
When the demibranchs of eulamellibranchs are observed in situ, the lamellae appear filamentous because the outer ciliated margins of the lobes have differentiated into the descending and ascending limbs of the so-called filament.
N[H.sub.4.sup.+] may be reabsorbed when it reaches the thick ascending limb because it substitutes for potassium ([K.sup.+]) on a transporter located in this segment that transports [Na.sup.+], [K.sup.+], and 2 Cl from the lumen into the cell.
A high dietary intake decreases reabsorption in the proximal tubule and ascending limb markedly.
In summary, calcium is reabsorbed passively via the paracellular pathways, driven by a chemical gradient in the proximal tubule and by the lumen-positive transepithelial voltage in the thick ascending limb. In the distal tubule, calcium is actively reabsorbed.
The thin ascending limb is virtually impermeable to water but transports sodium, chloride, and urea.