arytenoid dislocation

arytenoid dislocation

separation of the cricoarytenoid joint with subluxation of the arytenoid cartilage.

ar·y·ten·oid dis·lo·ca·tion

(ar-i-tē'noyd dis-lō-kā'shŭn)
Separation of the cricoarytenoid joint with subluxation of the arytenoid cartilage.
References in periodicals archive ?
New approach to diagnose arytenoid dislocation and subluxation using three-dimensional computed tomography.Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol.
These would cause further injuries to the mucosa and even arytenoid dislocation. Secondly, the risk of laryngospasm during the manipulation of intubation should not be overlooked as it carries certain morbidity and mortality.
It refers to partial displacement of the arytenoid within the cricoarytenoid joint, as distinct from arytenoid dislocation, which is complete separation of the arytenoid cartilage from the joint space.
A MeDLINe search of all cases to date using the search terms "arytenoid subluxation" and "arytenoid dislocation" identified fewer than 80 cases, although the true incidence is probably under-reported owing to misdiagnosis as vocal cord paresis.
Differentiation between an arytenoid dislocation and nerve injury can be difficult in these instances, and diagnosis usually is made with the aid of laryngeal examination, laryngeal electromyography, and computed tomography scanning.
Spiegel, "Arytenoid Dislocation," Journal of Voice 1, no.
Strobovideolaryngoscopy revealed findings consistent with complex posterior arytenoid dislocation (figure 1).
Utility of helical computed tomography in the study of arytenoid dislocation and arytenoid subluxation.
This can result in thyroid cartilage fracture, mucosal disruption, edema, arytenoid dislocation, and/or torn laryngeal ligaments.
The toxin can be used for the treatment of recurrent laryngeal granulomata, as an adjunctive treatment for arytenoid dislocation, and for the management of laryngeal synkinesis associated with reinnervation after recurrent nerve paralysis.
Common injuries following long-term intubation can manifest in the form of edema, ulceration, granulomas, arytenoid dislocations, adhesions, subglottic stenosis and vocal fold immobility, etc.