arytenoid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

arytenoid

 [ar″ĭ-te´noid]
shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage or arytenoid muscle of the larynx.

ar·y·te·noid

(ar'i-tē'noyd), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
[see arytenoideus]

arytenoid

(ăr′ĭ-tē′noid′, ə-rĭt′n-oid′)
n.
1. Either of two small pitcher-shaped cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal cords are attached.
2. A muscle connected to either of these cartilages.
3. Any of several small mucous glands located in front of these cartilages.
adj.
Of or relating to these cartilages or an associated muscle or gland.

ar′y·te·noi′dal adj.

arytenoid

adjective Ladle-shaped.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA]
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.

arytenoid

Ladle-shaped. Pertaining to the two small cartilages attached to the vocal cords at the back of the LARYNX or to the arytenoid muscles of the larynx. From the Greek arutaina , a pitcher or ladle, and eidos , like.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the arytenoid cartilage was separated from the cricoid cartilage in the left side, the exoeSL procedure with lower needle at lower edge of thyroid lamina 20 mm from the posterior edge of the thyroid lamina and upper needle at 22 mm from the posterior edge produced a sufficient glottic gap [Figure 3]B.
In supracricoid laryngectomy (SCPL) for transglottic tumors with glottic and supraglottic involvement and minimal extension to the infraglottis, the hyoid bone, the cricoid cartilage, and at least one arytenoid are preserved, thus maintaining the possibility of functional reconstruction.
Hoarseness after laryngeal blunt trauma: A differential diagnosis between an injury to the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve and an arytenoid subluxation.
Idiopathic mucosal lesions of the arytenoid cartilages of 21 Thoroughbred yearlings: 1997-2001.
Dislocation of the arytenoids can cause alterations of the voice, sore throat and pain on swallowing.
The thickening of the aryepiglottic folds and arytenoid cartilages causes the thumb sign, rather than the epiglottis.[4] The epiglottis resembles a human thumb in size and shape on the radiograph.
A survey performed by the American Broncho-Esophagological Association reported that the signs of LPR on laryngoscopy include vocal fold erythema, posterior commissure hypertrophy, arytenoid erythema, and arytenoid edema.' Additionally, the same survey found that flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy was the test of choice to diagnose LPR, with a dual pH probe with impedance testing as a valuable adjunct.
Performing a tieback to abduct and lock the left arytenoid in an open position is a simple concept but much more complex than it appears.
also reported a similar case to ours where the fish bone migrated into the paraglottic space, and after an unsuccessful endoscopic removal of the fish bone, the patient underwent a posterolateral approach to the paraglottic space, which is a modification of the approach used for arytenoid adduction.
Then, a modified posterior ML with a larger prosthesis projected toward the vocal process was placed to medially displace the vocal fold and arytenoid cartilage simultaneously.
International head and neck surgeons discuss in- and outpatient procedures including cordotomy, thyroplasty, arytenoid abduction, and minithyrotomy.