artificial ventilation


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ar·ti·fi·cial ven·ti·la·tion

any means of producing gas exchange mechanically or manually between the lungs and the surrounding air, which is not performed entirely by the person's own respiratory system.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ar·ti·fi·cial ven·ti·la·tion

(ahr'ti-fish'ăl ven'ti-lā'shŭn)
The process of supporting breathing by application of mechanical or manual means, when normal breathing is inefficient or not present.
Synonym(s): artificial respiration.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ar·ti·fi·cial ven·ti·la·tion

(ahr'ti-fish'ăl ven'ti-lā'shŭn)
Any means of producing gas exchange mechanically or manually between the lungs and the surrounding air, but not performed entirely by the person's own respiratory system.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Artificial ventilation and anesthesia are needed in critical care and trauma scenarios, and also required during invasive medical procedures.
The legal fight has centred around whether she should be given artificial ventilation if her condition worsened.
Parents Debbie and Darren Wyatt won a High Court ruling last month which lifted an earlier decision that doctors need not give Charlotte artificial ventilation to keep her alive.
It is vital that that is understood by all." Mrs Wyatt, 24, who is heavily pregnant with the couple's fourth child, and her husband Darren, 33, had asked the judge to lift his order as they said the condition of their daughter has improved to such an extent that she has now "crossed an invisible line", meaning that the use of artificial ventilation would be justified.
The third strategy (mixed mode) combines natural and artificial ventilation in transition spaces such as lobbies, foyers and the courtyard.
(1) The horrific impact of the polio epidemic of the early 1950's were the major impetus for the development of practical, effective means of providing artificial ventilation. The sophistication of today's microprocessor controlled machines and ventilatory adjuncts have added considerable complexity to the art and science of critical care.
"In our patient population, gravitational therapy led to a significant improvement of pulmonary function paired with a fundamental reduction of the invasiveness of artificial ventilation support," Dr.
The government argued in a brief application hearing last week that modern palliative care allows some patients to die if they withdraw from artificial ventilation. But Conway's counsel, Lord Pannick QC, told the court such a death "could last only a few minutes, but in some cases hours, and other cases days".
"Three children are in a critical condition today, they are connected to the artificial ventilation," the report said.
According to him, nearly 75 per cent of the patients at ProVita require artificial ventilation.
Severe hypoxia may require oxygen therapy and artificial ventilation.