artificial sweetener


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artificial sweetener

Any of a group of substances with a taste similar to the usual dietary sugars, glucose and sucrose that are metabolised incompletely or not at all, resulting in a minimal gain of calories.
References in periodicals archive ?
[USA], Aug 30 (ANI): Researchers have revealed, for the first time, how artificial sweeteners can stimulate appetite.
The rise in health awareness among the consumers, concerned about obesity, diabetes and the amount of calorie intake are driving the artificial sweetener market in the region.
Artificial sweeteners once offered a solution, but their popularity has dwindled among concerns that they don't help with weight management and could even cause weight gain, metabolic syndrome and high blood pressure with continual use.
Making smart, whole-food replacements can help you cut calories without overusing artificial sweeteners.
Professor Tom Sanders, a nutrition and dietetics expert from King's College London who was not involved with the study, said: 'The findings of this study are not surprising and confirm the view that artificial sweeteners are not a magic bullet to prevent obesity.
Artificial sweeteners bind themselves tighter or longer to cause increased sweetness1.
Perhaps artificial sweeteners, which are widely used in diet soda, yogurt, gum, ice cream, and other products, somehow amp up the immune system to attack the thyroid in some people.
Keywords: Artificial sweeteners Diabetes mellitus Natural sweeteners Reactive hypoglycaemia.
At this time, however, the National Cancer Institute says there's no clear scientific evidence that any artificial sweeteners approved in the U.S.
Furthermore, many artificial sweeteners are derived from completely natural sources, while what we think of as all-natural often isn't quite: table sugar is of course heavily refined, but so are many "natural" sweeteners--even agave nectar.
Artificial sweeteners are abundant in food and drinks, and often added to drugs and sanitary products as well.
The researchers gave eight endurance-trained cyclists a drink containing 6.4 per cent of glucose (a form of carbohydrate) and compared the results with those for a drink containing the artificial sweetener saccharin.