natural language

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language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

natural language

Language as used in ordinary verbal and written communication among humans, as distinguished from controlled vocabularies and structured languages used exclusively for communicating and interoperability among information systems.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lewis could also have extended his argument to include the importance of colonialism in driving the artificial language movement.
Four artificial languages that differed only in the stress pattern on their words were used.
Furthermore, an artificial language could also be learned if it connected signs and their grammatical form changes with the simplest syllables available, and if it, at the same time, could be communicated orally.
Other artificial languages are Volapuk, Ido and Glosa, a grammar-free international language based on Latin and Greek.
Yet, significantly, what are regarded as defects to be removed in the seventeenth-century artificial language schemes are precisely the characteristics to be cultivated in the rhetorics of the earlier century.
The critique of natural language, a common locus of linguistic reflection in the classical period, often led to the will to create an artificial language.(4) But there is no use dwelling here on the rudimentary and impracticable character of these attempts.(5)
The second stage suggests that an attempt to sufficiently qualify English so that an unwanted connotations remain is likely to lead to the introduction of an artificial language. As I envisage things, the use of an artificial language is not crucial for the centralist.
Ranging from John Wilkins (Philosophical Language) through William Bliss (Blissymbolics) to John Brown (Loglan), ILIL details the eccentricities, neuroses, and missteps of artificial language's "mad dreamers" over the last three hundred and fifty years or so, encouraging the reader not only to see them all as failures, but also to wonder whether the failure lay with the language or the inventor.
Rebecca Gomez, Richard Bootzin and Lynn Nadel in the psychology department at the University of Arizona in Tucson found that babies who are able to get in a little daytime nap are more likely to exhibit an advanced level of learning known as abstraction.Nadel, a Regents' Professor at the UA, has described the group's work (Early Learning in Infants May Depend on Sleep) in a session at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in San Diego on , February 21.In their research, Nadel and his colleagues played recordings of "phrases" created from an artificial language to four dozen 15-month-old infants during a learning session.
Large, The Artificial Language Movement (Oxford: Blackwell, 1985)).
I am also fortunate that a significant amount of my training was with John Eulenberg and Mort Rahimi of the Artificial Language Laboratory in East Lansing, Michigan.
For the study, the researchers used an artificial language in a carefully controlled laboratory experiment.