incubation

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incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn),
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions for the purpose of favoring growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Maintenance of an artificial environment for an infant, usually a premature or hypoxic one, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. The development, without sign or symptom, of an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

incubation

(ĭn′kyə-bā′shən, ĭng′-)
n.
1.
a. The act of incubating.
b. The state of being incubated.
2. Medicine The development of an infection from the time the pathogen enters the body until signs or symptoms first appear.
3. Medicine The maintenance of an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration in order to provide optimal conditions for growth and development.

in′cu·ba′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

incubation

Infectious disease The asymptomatic development of an infection Lab medicine The maintenance of controlled environmental conditions to facilitate growth of microorganisms or cells in culture Neonatology The maintenance of an 'enhanced' environment to optimize growth of a premature or otherwise compromised infant
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Maintaining a controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures.
2. Maintaining an artificial environment for an infant, usually one who is premature or hypoxic, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. Developing, without sign or symptom, an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

incubation

  1. the process of brooding or incubating in birds.
  2. the period between infection by a pathogen and appearance of disease symptoms.
  3. the maintenance of microbiological cultures at specific temperatures for a given time.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Incubation

The time period between exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus or bacteria, and the appearance of symptoms of illness.
Mentioned in: Hemorrhagic Fevers
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Development, without sign or symptom, of an infection.
[L. incubo, to lie on]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
TABLE I NUMBER OF NESTS OF ORINOCO CROCODILE STUDIED IN THE COJEDES RIVER SYSTEM, VENEZUELA Number Incubated Hatchlings Hatching Nest of eggs eggs produced success Artificial incubation 1 59 57 11 19.3 2 48 46 34 73.9 3 45 45 30 66.7 4 36 28 26 92.9 5 51 51 40 78.4 6 51 48 7 14.6 7 50 40 3 7.5 8 56 53 40 75.5 Totals 396 368 191 51.9 Control nests (natural incubation) 9 49.5 0 0 0 10 49.5 0 0 0 11 49.5 0 32 64.6 12 49.5 0 23 46.5 13 49.5 0 35 70.7 Totals 248 0 90 36.3 The number of eggs of control nest was not counted.
Stage-2 juveniles produced by artificial incubation must be removed by hand from incubators, and this occurs usually at the end of incubation, when the first moult period concludes.
Artificial incubation lasted 40 days and no fungal growth was observed over dead eggs.
Mason (1977) tried artificial incubation of eggs during the last period of development (May) as single or pooled broods, obtaining higher survival rates by incubating single broods.
Artificial incubation of crayfish eggs (Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana) from early stages of embryonic development.
Effects of dead egg removal frequency on stage 2 juvenile production in artificial incubation of Austropotamobius pallipes Lereboullet.
Effects of different antifungal treatments on artificial incubation of the astacid crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana) eggs.
Effectiveness of antifungal treatments during artificial incubation of the signal crayfish eggs (Pacifastacus leniusculus Dana.
Effects of different thermal treatments during embryonic development on the artificial incubation efficiency of crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes Lereboullet) eggs.
Effects of stripping time on the success of the artificial incubation of freshwater crayfish, Austropotamobius pallipes (Lereboullet), eggs.
The ibis, named Yu Yu, was hatched at the center May 21 through artificial incubation, from an egg produced by two birds donated by China.

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