artificial dye

artificial dye

A synthetic substance which imparts a desired colour to a food, drug or cosmetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first artificial dye was synthesized in the laboratory in 1856, and permanent hair colorants have been in commercial use for over 100 years.
Other topics include mechanical strength tests on 1976 PVC pipe, secondary contamination in Polish drinking water, pipe break detection, corrosion models for cast iron trunk mains, and the adsorption of cationic artificial dye on spent tea leaves.
A two-choice test was also conducted to compare the gelatinized blend both with or without artificial dye.
While it might be impossible to prevent your children from eating anything with artificial dye, you can do your part by shopping at Whole Foods or Trader Joe's--both chains have banned products that use artificial dyes and carry all-natural food coloring for home cooking and baking projects.
And that's just what William Henry Perkin did back in 1856 when he produced the world's first artificial dye.
Well, if a mad German drains all your blood, then pumps back in an artificial dye after clamping off a major artery, you're screwed.
In response to customer requests for more natural formulas, the products are now free of parabens, phthalates, petrolatum, gluten and artificial dye, and are not tested on animals.
All of Tint & Tonic's products are artificial dye, chemical, paraben, and preservative-free, and are packaged in sustainable, biodegradable and recyclable containers.
Somewhere along the way, they removed the artificial dye and consumers accepted the change, and embraced it.
In addition, wild-caught Alaska salmon need no artificial dye or other enhancements to provide rich color, texture and flavor.
The company announced earlier that it had removed artificial dyes from all doughnuts sold in the US.
CVS is now offering new, unexpected products in store brand lines such as cold/cough products that are free of artificial dyes and preservatives; products that can only be found in medical and hospital settings such as the Advanced Wound Care line; and "boutique" name brands on shelves that could previously only be found in specialty stores.