artificial dye

(redirected from artificial colourant)

artificial dye

A synthetic substance which imparts a desired colour to a food, drug or cosmetic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Look instead for products that provide natural alternatives, rose or propolis extract can be used instead of parabens as a preservative; and avocado can provide as nice a green as any artificial colourant.
The product is manufactured without the use of preservatives, artificial colourants or intense sweeteners.
Healthier snacks or snacks made from natural ingredients, free from monosodium glutamine and artificial colourants, are increasingly desired by the growing number of health-conscious consumers.
He said like olive oil, nut and seed oils are also infused with natural essences without using artificial colourants, antioxidants or food additives.
It is a cold-water-dispersible powder formulation offers the option of replacing artificial colourants on a long-term basis.
As with all Erlenbacher products, Love Cakes are made using high quality fresh ingredients without the addition of artificial flavours, artificial colourants, preservatives or hydrogenated fats and oils.
Since a 2007 study conducted at the University of Southampton linked the artificial colourants sunset yellow, quinoline yellow, carmosine, allura red, ponceau 4R and tartrazine--subsequently dubbed the Southampton Six--to increased hyperactivity in children, a prevailing sense of latent uneasiness has risen to the level of outright alarm.
For example, some beauty salons mix natural henna with chemicals or artificial colourants, which is against the law," Salman said.
All Essensity products are free from artificial fragrances, silicones, paraffin or mineral oils, parabens, peg derivates and artificial colourants yet still deliver 100% performance.
A new European Union law means drinks makers must display a warning if their products contain artificial colourants linked to behavioural problems in kids.
We do not believe that the industry is solely focused on replacing artificial colourants, but rather, the global trends point to an increased demand by consumers, of ingredients that they can actually recognise on a label, such as 'fruit and vegetable juice'.
A leading Irish scientist has accused the EU of passing "daft laws" in response to a perceived threat to children from food additives and artificial colourants.