articulation

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articulation

 [ahr-tik″u-la´shun]
1. any place of junction between two different parts or objects.
2. enunciation of words and sentences.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·tic·u·la·tion

(ar-tik'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. Synonym(s): joint
2. A joining or connecting together loosely to allow motion between parts.
3. Distinct, coherent, connected speech or enunciation.
4. In dentistry, the contact relationship of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth during jaw movement.
[see articulatio]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

articulation

(är-tĭk′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1. The act of vocal expression; utterance or enunciation: an articulation of the group's sentiments.
2.
a. The act or manner of producing a speech sound.
b. A speech sound, especially a consonant.
3. Anatomy
a. A fixed or movable joint between bones.
b. A movable joint between inflexible parts of the body of an animal, as the divisions of an appendage in arthropods.

ar·tic′u·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē), ar·tic′u·la′tive (-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

articulation

Anatomy Joint The point where two bones meet via a cartilaginous bridge,
Speech pathology The physical movements made by the speech organs (mouth, tongue and throat) in verbal communication.
Vox populi The coherency and clarity of expression.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

articulation

Neurology 
1. Speech.
2. The ability to produce intelligible speech, through the appropriate interaction of the lips, tongue and palate.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ar·tic·u·la·tion

(ahr-tik'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Synonym(s): joint.
2. A juncture or connection that permits motion between parts.
3. The process of coordinating movement of oral, laryngeal, and pharyngeal structures to produce speech.
4. dentistry The contact relationship of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth during jaw movement.
See also: synovial joint
[L. a forming of vines]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

articulation

A joint.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

articulation

see JOINT.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ar·tic·u·la·tion

(ahr-tik'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, the contact relationship of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth during jaw movement.
2. Synonym(s): joint.
3. A joining or connecting together loosely to allow motion between parts.
[L. a forming of vines]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Skowronek's archetypical articulative president is likely to serve with his party controlling Congress, perhaps by substantial margins, which was clearly not Bush's experience.
(b.) /[epsilon][??]/--nonexistent as a monosyllable in English--is of course very common in Chinese, and a good example of how phonotactic constraints can be quite arbitrary, and unrelated to articulative convenience.
Such careful study of the array as source and impetus for particular contextual associations also influences our understanding of musical form: the sonic boundary we first noted at the end of measure 11 acquires an articulative function as form emerges more subtly from a body of contextual associations and compositional details in array realization.
The former is based on articulative phonetics, and attempts to create a set of symbols that are at once independent of any particular language, and capable of a comprehensive description of the sound patterns of all the world's languages.
This is but one example of the articulative complexity of speech, and how little information is actually imparted by standard phonetic symbols.
Thus, even as his analyses delineate similar procedures in different atonal works, he always attempts to respect the surface details, articulative boundaries of phrases, and traditional formal integrity of each piece.
I make two assumptions of this sort at the very outset - firstly, that unity and continuity of style are necessary in order to define and unleash these structural dissonances and, secondly, that analogical frames of reference (categories of "seeing something as") are freely transferrable between articulative levels of whatever order of magnitude and formal scope.
In purely articulative terms, their close status encourages their use as semiconsonants [j] and [w], in that the brief duration of such articulations naturally "explode" into the ensuing more open vowel, in a way that the more open vowels themselves cannot do with one another.
They exist solely on condition that they relinquish any claim to enter into more complexly fruitful formal associations except in the form of primitive chains or by a despairing reliance on the shaky mechanisms of the "Contrast Principle." By proclaiming their tendentially absolutist iconic pretensions they become, paradoxically, interchangeable, depersonalized tokens of generally (but only generally) recognizable categories of communicational activity, since it is principally by means of some degree of porousness that a gestural unit attains access to any viable framework of articulative possibilities.
Yet there are two principal ways in which the IPA as a transcription tool falls short of a complete description of the articulative events involved in singing, regardless of how much detail is applied to the transcription.
Continuum for Harpsichord (1968) and Coulee for organ (1969) represent a distinct category in Gyorgy Ligeti's work, one in which patterns of pitch and interval evolve gradually and smoothly beneath an articulative surface that behaves, as he says, "like a precision mechanism."(1) Ligeti produces this fluid, mechanistic music by deploying an extremely fast, even succession of notes primarily in tremolandi and scalar figures which, at the end, abruptly cease "as though torn off." Some of his larger works of the same period contain similar music: the Second String Quartet (1968), Ramifications (1969), and the Chamber Concerto (1970).
This category merges with VC/V below in articulative terms, the only distinction between them being orthographic.