articulate

(redirected from articulates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to articulates: odontoid process, abstained

articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]
References in periodicals archive ?
What are the consequences if theologians don't try to articulate our
Meakin traces "articulate" to its Latin root, which "denotes the joints or limbs of the body, or more abstractly, 'pieces', which are distinctly divided, yet form a coherent whole', hence, clear, distinct speech itself." Meakin continues, "An articulation is thus paradoxical, for it is a whole which is only whole o r coherent as a result of the differentiation of parts within itself" (20).
This collection reminds the reader of late-night arguments among old friends - it contains earnest, articulate, and hard-fought presentations, the invoking of familiar deities as well as individual totems.
The fact that neither dimension is alluded to explicitly is only one of several examples of the author's espousing assumptions that he either does not articulate, or articulates as if they were (to use his own phrases) "authorless" texts claiming ultimate, unquestionable authority.
Continue doing this movement six to twelve times keeping your chest, neck and head soft and feeling which parts of your spine you articulate and which you do not articulate as easily.
Loewenstein regards this epochal moment of authorial self-consciousness less as Jonson's individual legacy--though Jonson was its most articulate proponent--than as the outcome of negotiations among writers, publishers, acting companies, and others who stood to profit from publishing in an era before copyright laws.
With two of the three principal columns concealed behind the service wall, the paired plates that form the third structural support not only articulate the shop, living room and bedroom, but also define space for dressing and bathing.