articulate

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articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lāt)
1. to pronounce clearly and distinctly.
2. to make speech sounds by manipulation of the vocal organs.
3. to express in coherent verbal form.
4. to divide into or unite so as to form a joint.
5. in dentistry, to adjust or place the teeth in their proper relation to each other in making an artificial denture.

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lit)
1. divided into distinct, meaningful syllables or words.
2. endowed with the power of speech.
3. characterized by the use of clear, meaningful language.
4. divided into or united by joints.

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

[ärtik′yəlāt]
Etymology: L, articulare, to divide into joints
1 to form a joint.
2 to configure the supraglottal airway to produce consonants and vowels, resulting in speech that is distinct and connected. articular, adj, articulation, n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate (ärtik´yōōlāt),

v 1. to arrange or place in connected sequence. See also arrangement, tooth.
v 2. to connect by articulating strips, paper, or cloth coated with ink-containing or dye-containing wax, used for marking or locating occlusal contacts.

articulate

1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
His innovation is to in effect argue that the expression of the idea, the articulateness or meaningfulness of the universal, already in itself takes the form of a task, and with that of a particular mode of accountability.
Perhaps--to risk a cliche, and pace Carey--Nureyev inherited all the articulateness for which Wilde was renowned in his day.
She calls them demi-gods, and remains amazed by the articulateness of their forms, and the self-possession with which they occupied her home and space for the months after they appeared.
of brilliant articulateness, with its implicit substitution of form for
However, the opening discussion between Antigone and Ismene gives a full picture of her articulateness and concern for communicating her motivations.
Stevenson's wit and articulateness became disadvantages rather than virtues, making him look like an "egghead" in comparison to his opponent, the plainspoken former football player and army general Eisenhower.
The usual characteristics of individuals that determine leadership and task differentiation in small groups, such as knowledge, articulateness, energy, and available time, were operative in these groups.
progress toward a full articulateness of the author's feminist
I reflected on how articulateness in one setting may be disruptive in another, how Black assertiveness can be read as aggressive to people from cultures who value controlled emotion and physicality.
In terms of the less easily defined aspects of the fit, however, articulateness gives way to grayness.
However, Douglass rejects the articulateness of a broken body, insisting that whites need to listen to blacks' speech and that blacks must assert their roles as thinkers, actors, and interpreters--not merely as suffering witnesses.