articular cartilage


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to articular cartilage: hyaline cartilage

cartilage

 [kahr´tĭ-lij]
a specialized, fibrous connective tissue present in adults, and forming most of the temporary skeleton in the embryo, providing a model in which most of the bones develop, and constituting an important part of the organism's growth mechanism; the three most important types are hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage. Also, a general term for a mass of such tissue in a particular site in the body.
 Involvement of joint and cartilage in osteoarthritis. From ARHP Arthritis Teaching Slide Collection, American College of Rheumatology.
alar c's the cartilages of the wings of the nose.
aortic cartilage the second costal cartilage on the right side.
arthrodial cartilage (articular cartilage) that lining the articular surfaces of synovial joints.
arytenoid c's two pyramid-shaped cartilages of the larynx.
connecting cartilage that connecting the surfaces of an immovable joint.
costal cartilage a bar of hyaline cartilage that attaches a rib to the sternum in the case of true ribs, or to the immediately above rib in the case of the upper false ribs.
cricoid cartilage a ringlike cartilage forming the lower and back part of the larynx.
diarthrodial cartilage articular cartilage.
elastic cartilage cartilage that is more opaque, flexible, and elastic than hyaline cartilage, and is further distinguished by its yellow color. The ground substance is penetrated in all directions by frequently branching fibers that give all of the reactions for elastin.
ensiform cartilage xiphoid process.
fibrous cartilage fibrocartilage.
floating cartilage a detached portion of semilunar cartilage in the knee joint.
hyaline cartilage flexible, somewhat elastic, semitransparent cartilage with an opalescent bluish tint, composed of a basophilic fibril-containing substance with cavities in which the chondrocytes occur.
 Hyaline cartilage. The matrix nearest the chondrocytes is intensely staining; although the matrix appears homogeneous, collagen fibrils may be visualized by polarized light or electron microscopy. From Dorland's, 2000.
Meckel's cartilage the ventral cartilage of the first branchial arch.
permanent cartilage cartilage that does not normally become ossified.
Reichert's cartilage the dorsal cartilage of the second branchial arch.
reticular cartilage elastic cartilage.
semilunar cartilage one of the two interarticular cartilages of the knee joint.
temporary cartilage cartilage that is normally destined to be replaced by bone.
thyroid cartilage the shield-shaped cartilage of the larynx, underlying the laryngeal prominence on the surface of the neck.
vomeronasal cartilage either of the two narrow strips of cartilage, one on each side, of the nasal septum supporting the vomeronasal organ.
yellow cartilage elastic cartilage.

ar·tic·u·lar car·ti·lage

the cartilage covering the articular surfaces of the bones participating in a synovial joint.

articular cartilage

Etymology: L, articulare + cartilago
a type of hyaline connective tissue that covers the articulating surfaces of bones within synovial joints. See also cartilage.

articular cartilage

 A hyaline cartilaginous covering over the opposing/articulating surface of the bones of synovial joints

ar·tic·u·lar car·ti·lage

(ahr-tik'yū-lăr kahr'ti-lăj)
The cartilage covering the articular surfaces of the bones participating in a synovial joint.

articular cartilage

the layer of cartilage covering the end of a bone that forms a joint surface, providing, among its many functions, shock absorption, even distribution of load across the joint and nutrition of the underlying bone. Damage is common in sport, especially to cartilages in the knee joint. Permanent damage or surgical removal accelerates the development of arthritis. See also meniscus.

ar·tic·u·lar car·ti·lage

(ahr-tik'yū-lăr kahr'ti-lăj)
The cartilage covering the articular surfaces of the bones participating in a synovial joint.

articular

pertaining to a joint.

articular capsule
see articular capsule.
articular cartilage
see cartilage.
Enlarge picture
Erosion of the humeral articular cartilage in a dog viewed by arthroscopy. By permission from Tams T, Small Animal Endoscopy, Mosby, 1999
articular cartilage disease
see arthritis, degenerative joint disease.
congenital articular rigidity
caused by inherited defects, intrauterine viral infections, ingestion of poisons including plants and anthelmintics. See also contracted, contracted foal, lupinus.
articular meniscus
similar to an articular disk but is semicircular or C-shaped.
articular plate
the cartilaginous covering at the epiphysis of bones in arthrodial joints. Together with the growth cartilage comprises the joint cartilage.
articular rigidity
fixation of a joint, including arthrogryposis and ankylosis. May be caused by contracture of tendons, ligaments or muscles, by deformity of joint surfaces or by fusion of them.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lateral compartment in knees with isolated medial and patellofemoral osteoarthritis: A histologic analysis of articular cartilage.
Although the use of biologic agents in OA have not been shown to reduce the progression of structural damage to articular cartilage, as seen in an intensely inflammatory arthritis such as RA, further studies are warranted since a tendency towards reduced structural damage in this type of arthritis was observed with the use of low-dose INF infusion in a relatively short time-frame.
The Clinical Use of Human Culture-Expanded Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted on Platelet-Rich Fibrin Glue in the Treatment of Articular Cartilage Defects: A Pilot Study and Preliminary Results.
The study utilized a computational modelling method integrating the tissue and cellular levels of the articular cartilage in order to analyze the function of the articular cartilage during the onset and progression of osteoarthritis.
Unfortunately, the meniscus does not function well at the site of the tear, so avoiding surgery will probably not protect the articular cartilage at that site.
This arcade penetrates the posterior portion of the lateral epicondyle and radiates anteriorly and medially finally terminating at the epiphyseal articular cartilage with no collateral contribution.
Double staining with safranin O and fast green revealed a remarkable reduction in the cartilage's sulphated proteoglycan content at the transitional and radial zones, which indicated articular cartilage degeneration (Figure 3(a)).
Histological studies of new-borns to one-month old babies evidenced articular cartilage chondrocytes as an immature physis, with disorganized chondrocytes not forming orderly columns.
The simultaneous effect of lower-body positive pressure on articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response associated with walking has not yet been studied.