articulate

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articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lāt)
1. to pronounce clearly and distinctly.
2. to make speech sounds by manipulation of the vocal organs.
3. to express in coherent verbal form.
4. to divide into or unite so as to form a joint.
5. in dentistry, to adjust or place the teeth in their proper relation to each other in making an artificial denture.

articulate

/ar·tic·u·late/ (ahr-tik´u-lit)
1. divided into distinct, meaningful syllables or words.
2. endowed with the power of speech.
3. characterized by the use of clear, meaningful language.
4. divided into or united by joints.

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

[ärtik′yəlāt]
Etymology: L, articulare, to divide into joints
1 to form a joint.
2 to configure the supraglottal airway to produce consonants and vowels, resulting in speech that is distinct and connected. articular, adj, articulation, n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate (ärtik´yōōlāt),

v 1. to arrange or place in connected sequence. See also arrangement, tooth.
v 2. to connect by articulating strips, paper, or cloth coated with ink-containing or dye-containing wax, used for marking or locating occlusal contacts.

articulate

1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
References in periodicals archive ?
One final example of the characters' rudimentary language presenting emotion, this time with perfect articulacy, concerns the death of Tom Brangwen.
The scene is powerful and brilliantly acted but somewhat weakened by an unprecedented burst of emotional articulacy from Gerard ("If you're like me, the future is as fantasized as the past").
We can also read representations of consciousness, self-consciousness, articulacy and inarticulacy in men's texts as claims about men's subjectivity, and examine them for consequent aporias.
It is a testament to Foley's articulacy that in a quick final chapter he can confer retrospective tragic credibility on emotions that initially seem hyperbolical: "Now in late middle age and regrettably disposed to dismissiveness and disgust, I have only to recall her words then to know that I have been illuminated by glory.
It seems odd to clump us all in the category of ``children'', when there are clear differences in the level of articulacy between, say, a five-year-old and a 17-year-old.
To apply and be relevant to a diverse range of ages, levels of understanding and articulacy.
Nussbaum's humane and learned essay argues convincingly that the etiology of disgust in human discomfort with our irreducible animality makes it an unreliable and dangerous basis for legal enactments; she also effectively highlights the greater proportionality and articulacy of indignation.
Nonetheless, the realities of his other duties meant that he was unable to hear as many cases as he would have liked, but his scintillating intellect and articulacy came to the fore in his judgements, cutting to the core of complex legal issues.
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This quality consists of bearing, in the quick of the symbolizing utterance, and upon the beat of its articulacy, the burden of 'omnis iste cursus mortalitatis' (all this course of mortality -- Saint Augustine).
Other manifestations of a new and confident artisan articulacy can be glimpsed in the post-war infidel debating clubs as well as in the growing appetite for political "speechifying," most controversially at the December 1816 Spa Fields insurrection but also more generally in the succession of meetings convened there in early 1817 (Worrall 1992).
Scots intellectuals were also `stretched' between their European political allies and ideologies and their articulacy in English.