articulate

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articulate

 [ahr-tik´u-lāt]
1. to unite by joints; to join.
2. united by joints.
3. capable of expressing oneself orally.

ar·tic·u·late

(ar-tik'yū-lit),
1. Synonym(s): articulated
2. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

(är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Composed of distinct, meaningful syllables or words: articulate speech.
2. Having the power of speech.
3. Biology Consisting of sections united by joints; jointed.
v. (-lāt′) articu·lated, articu·lating, articu·lates
v.tr.
1. To pronounce distinctly and carefully; enunciate.
2. To utter (a speech sound) by making the necessary movements of the speech organs.
3. Biology To unite by forming a joint or joints.
v.intr.
1. To speak clearly and distinctly.
2. To utter a speech sound.
3. Biology To form a joint; be jointed: The thighbone articulates with the bones of the hip.

ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
ar·tic′u·late·ness, ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

articulate

Dentistry The conforming of the upper to the lower teeth, especially when adjusting prostheses, bridgework, and crowns to the 'natural' apposing surface Speech To speak concisely

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Synonym(s): articulated.
2. Capable of distinct and connected speech.
3. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
4. To speak distinctly and connectedly.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]

articulate

to connect by means of a joint.

ar·tic·u·late

(ahr-tikyū-lăt)
1. Capable of distinct and connected meaningful speech.
2. To join or connect together loosely to allow motion between the parts.
3. To speak distinctly and precisely.
[L. articulo, pp. -atus, to articulate]
References in periodicals archive ?
As the narrative of the novel unfolds, we can gradually perceive that the limitation in the narrative articulacy is made particularly apparent at moments of emotional fullness.
The scene is powerful and brilliantly acted but somewhat weakened by an unprecedented burst of emotional articulacy from Gerard ("If you're like me, the future is as fantasized as the past").
The regendering of Hamlet, Howard finds, inevitably raises related questions about "the nature of subjectivity, articulacy, and action" (1), with the presence of the female Hamlet serving as "an elusive signifier of both schism and possibility" (x).
"What binds [the stories] all together so impressively is O'Flynn's emotional articulacy, which captures life's sad, strange absurdities and glosses them with a kind of nobility." HEPHZIBAH ANDERSON
Because her finely tuned articulacy and stage-managing skills come to dominate the drama's second half and climactic courtroom scene, her character serves in the logic of the film as a vehicle for authorial intent.
The bitter dissatisfaction with the status quo and frequently savage critical articulacy that is apparent in much of Barthes's work is camouflaged by Sontag's emphasis on the elegance and quiddity that exists in the same essays.
The language and tone of the piece thus becomes equally bravado and a form of entrapment, while there is no confidence in one's ability to articulate rage and compassion beyond this limitation of a playful, exaggerated hyper fiction, with violence as its basis, as if irony has lost its articulacy, and has become entrapment.
British and North American narrative medicine, different as they are in some respects, converge in aspiring to offer patients the great gift of articulacy in storytelling.
Nottingham males: computer technician, nurse, decorator, stock controller, shop assistant, caretaker; bright, open, straightforward, down-to-earth, limited articulacy
Enabling: the process should be equally accessible to all stakeholders; stakeholders must have the capacity to participate in terms of articulacy, technical literacy and resources.
Articulacy.") The candidate himself doesn't fully grasp the implications of the regressive tax policies and harmful environmental deregulations he favors, but he knows what his financial backers want, and he's happy to oblige.
And it is a tension that--for want of that precious medium, civilization--looks likely to increase, for our extremes are becoming very extreme indeed: a modernity drained of any of the bright refinements and moral ambitions of Enlightenment reason or humanist idealism, reduced to a "high" culture of insipid ethical authoritarianism and a low culture consisting in dreary hedonism (without a hint of healthy Rabelaisian festivity), ever more explicit and repetitive celebrations of violence, sartorial and sexual slovenliness, atrocious music, and an idyllic emancipation from the fetters of literacy or (in fact) articulacy; and an antiquity of real and dynamic power, but largely uncontrolled by any mediating forces of order, stability, unity, or calm.