arthroscope

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Related to arthroscopies: Arthroscopic surgery

arthroscope

 [ahr´thro-skōp]
an endoscope for examining the interior of a joint. The arthroscope is designed to allow passage of surgical instruments, thus permitting concurrent surgery within a joint. Arthroscopy is an alternative to surgical incision and creation of an open surgical wound. The procedure may be done under either local or general anesthesia. Postoperative complications rarely occur, but infection, bleeding into the joint, swelling, rupture of the synovium, thrombophlebitis, and joint injury are possible.

ar·thro·scope

(ar'thrō-skōp),
An endoscope for examining the internal anatomy of a joint.

arthroscope

Orthopedics A thin fiberoptic endoscope with 3 channels which is introduced into a joint space via a small incision

ar·thro·scope

(ahr'thrŏ-skōp)
An endoscope for examining the interior of a joint.

Arthroscope

An instrument for the visual examination of the interior of a joint.
Mentioned in: Rotator Cuff Injury

ar·thro·scope

(ahr'thrŏ-skōp)
An endoscope for examining the internal anatomy of a joint.

Patient discussion about arthroscope

Q. Is ligament heating better than an arthroscopic surgery? I have a partial tear in my left knee (acl) and they wanna operate on me. I heard heating it can solve the problem. is it true?

A. i never heard of "ligament heating" from what i know- ligament has limited ability to regenerate. if partially torn it may need only physiotherapy and care. but if it's torn more then it can heal by itself- you need surgery. this is why there's orthopedics- to evaluate the situation, give you a diagnosis and the recommended treatment. it's always good to second guess because they are only human. you can ask other orthopedics and see what they say.

More discussions about arthroscope
References in periodicals archive ?
All Arthroscopies were done in our hospital environment with complete preoperative care by experienced surgeons.
Clarke and colleagues, in their prospective study of 1,054 consecutive hip arthroscopies, had no reports of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.
However, the increased risk of developing VTE associated with OC use has been well documented and can be extrapolated to hip arthroscopies. The one female patient that experienced a postoperative DVT in the series by Salvo used OCs.
(13) Philippon and colleagues (22) reviewed 37 revision hip arthroscopies and found unaddressed signs of FAI in 36 of these cases.
In particular, MRI has a high specificity and negative predictive value, suggesting that screening MRI studies can effectively rule out the presence of meniscal lesions and ligament injuries and reduce the number of unnecessary diagnostic arthroscopies performed.
(6) The combination of clinical and MRI findings would reduce the number of arthroscopies to 5%.
All arthroscopies were performed and reported by the same senior orthopaedic surgeon specialized in arthroscopic surgery who was aware of the ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings prior to arthroscopy in all cases.
This led to safer techniques in portal placement, technical advances in arthroscopic equipment, and an ever increasing number of elbow arthroscopies performed each year.
Kelly and colleagues reported on 473 arthroscopies, with 89% done by experienced elbow surgeons.
Several investigations like x-ray, MRI and diagnostic arthroscopies have been considered.
In a recent study, 31,516 knee arthroscopies revealed that chondral lesions were present in 63%, with an average of 2.7 hyaline cartilage lesions per knee.
(1.) Curl WW, Krome J, Gordon ES, et al: Cartilage injuries: A review of 31,516 knee arthroscopies. Arthroscopy 1997;13:456-60.