arthropathy

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Related to arthropathies: sclerosis, gout, Gouty arthropathy

arthropathy

 [ahr-throp´ah-the]
any joint disease.
Charcot's arthropathy neuropathic arthropathy.
chondrocalcific arthropathy progressive polyarthritis with joint swelling and bony enlargement, most commonly in the small joints of the hand but also affecting other joints, characterized radiographically by narrowing of the joint space with subchondral erosions and sclerosis and frequently chondrocalcinosis.
neuropathic arthropathy chronic progressive degeneration of the stress-bearing portion of a joint, with hypertrophic changes at the periphery; it is associated with neurologic disorders involving loss of sensation in the joint. Called also Charcot's arthropathy.
osteopulmonary arthropathy clubbing of fingers and toes, and enlargement of ends of the long bones, in cardiac or pulmonary disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·throp·a·thy

(ar-throp'ă-thē),
Any disease affecting a joint.
[arthro- + G. pathos, suffering]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arthropathy

(är-thrŏp′ə-thē)
n. pl. arthropa·thies
A disease or abnormality of a joint.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

arthropathy

A general term for any disease of the joints. See Neuropathic arthropathy, Silicone arthropathy, Traumatic arthropathy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ar·throp·a·thy

(ahr-throp'ă-thē)
Any disease affecting a joint.
[G. arthron, joint + G. pathos, suffering]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arthropathy

Any disease of a joint.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ar·throp·a·thy

(ahr-throp'ă-thē)
Any disease affecting a joint.
[arthro- + G. pathos, suffering]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about arthropathy

Q. Our GP said that I have a greater risk for joint disease because I am HLA-B27 + . what is he talking about? My mom and dad have a spondyloarthropathy. they went to our GP and he did us some genetic tests and said that I am HLA-B27 positive, and that i have a greater risk for several diseases. what kind of diseases is he talking about?

A. HLA-B27 is a part of our immune system. Some of us )like me) have this gene and some of us don't have it. The fact you have this gene says you might have some diseases.
Those diseases are mainly arthritis for its kinds and inflammatory bowel diseases (witch I have and its totally manageable.
if your parents have only spondyloarthropathy I guess you can expect you will have a spondyloarthropathy too.
Go to your GP and ask him to explain you more about this.

More discussions about arthropathy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Current MRI techniques of the hands and fingers provide a valuable tool for assessment and characterization of traumatic injuries to small structures, various arthropathies, and neoplastic processes.
The keywords "treatment," "management" "guidelines" "recommendations" "colchicine" "nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs" "Anakinra" and "corticosteroids" were successively associated with the terms "deposition" "crystalinduced," "micro-crystalline," "deposition," "arthropathies," or "arthritis" and with the name of the different deposition disease (e.g., for "calcium pyrophosphate deposition" the key words "chondrocalcinosis," "calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals" and "pseudogout" were also used).
In the present study, we evaluated serum YKL-40 as a possible marker for both peripheral and axial arthropathies in patients with IBD, and we assessed its biological variation and compared it with that reported for CRP and serum amyloid A (SAA) (18,19).
They are detectable in a wide spectrum of arthropathies, and indeed in a number of healthy [people]," El-Gabalawy tells Science News.
Peripheral arthropathies of IBD were first classified into Types I and II by Orchard and associates, and these classifications are still in use today (Table 3).
The text uses a simple approach to diagnosis focusing on the use of radiographs and the more common arthropathies and their hallmarks, excluding any deviations.
This relatively new technology also may prove useful in evaluating nodular lesions, diagnosing concurrent gout in patients with other arthropathies, and identifying urate deposits in body areas that are atypical for gout or challenging to assess.
Ultimately, patients with end-stage renal disease who do not respond to drug therapy may require nocturnal dialysis for the treatment of crystal arthropathies. Clinicians should not be put off by the complexity of arranging for this treatment if it leads to an improvement in symptoms.
None of the published studies reviewed for the AAP document showed a statistically significant increase in arthropathies, although there is a trend for mild to moderate events, noted Dr.
Using extensive illustrations and clinical x-ray films, the authors explain the most common spinal disorders, including thoracolumbar trauma, mechanical lower-back pain, prolapsed thoracolumbar intervertebral discs, lumbar spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, infections, tumors, inflammatory arthropathies, disorders of the sacrum and coccyx, cervical spine and related soft-tissue injuries, cervical radiculopathy, cervical spondylosis and myelopathy, the rheumatoid spine, and pediatric spinal conditions.
The crystal arthropathies, gout and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease, are caused by deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) or calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD) crystals, respectively.
All quinolones and fluoroquinolones can induce arthropathies in immature animals when given directly, and there have been case reports of lesions in cartilage in human children who have taken fluoroquinolones.