arthrodesis

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arthrodesis

 [ahr″thro-de´sis]
artificial ankylosis; surgical fusion of a joint.

ar·throd·e·sis

(ar-throd'ĕ-sis, ar-thrō-dē'sis),
The stiffening of a joint by operative means.
[arthro- + G. desis, a binding together]

arthrodesis

(är-thrŏd′ĭ-sĭs, är′thrə-dē′sĭs)
n. pl. arthrode·ses (-sēz)
The surgical fixation of a joint to promote bone fusion, used to treat intractable pain.

arthrodesis

The creation of a bony union across a joint, which can be either spontaneous or surgical.

Sites of surgical arthrodesis, best joints
Ankle, knee, shoulder, hip.
 
Indications
Differ according to the joint: ankle arthrodesis is performed for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and post-traumatic arthritis; arthrodesis of the knee is usually performed as a last resort for infections (such as TB or neuropathic joint secondary to diabetes or syphilis), given the compromise in mobility that it causes.

Technique
Joints are denuded of cartilage, then shaped to conform to each other at the optimal angle; bone grafting is often used, as is some form of fixation, either internal (screws, rods, plates) or external (e.g., with a cast or external fixator).

arthrodesis

Joint fusion Orthopedics The creation of a bony union across a joint, which can be spontaneous or surgical; best arthrodesis joints: ankle, knee, shoulder, hip Indications Differ according to the joint; ankle arthrodesis is performed for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and posttraumatic arthritis; arthrodesis of the knee is usually performed as a last resort, given the compromise in mobility that it causes–eg sitting on airplanes or in movies, for infections–eg, TB or neuropathic joint 2º to DM or syphilis. See Chamley arthrodesis.

ar·thro·de·sis

(ahr-thrō'dē-sis)
The stiffening of a joint by operative means.
Synonym(s): artificial ankylosis, syndesis.
[arthro- + G. desis, a binding together]

arthrodesis

The fusion of the bones on either side of a joint so that no joint movement is possible. This may occur spontaneously, as a result of disease processes, or may be a deliberate surgical act done to relieve pain and improve function.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wideman Jr, "Complications and long-term results of ankle arthrodeses following trauma," Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery A, vol.
(65-70) In patients with RA, the functional limitations of bilateral wrist arthrodeses may be severe.
Functional assessment of bilateral wrist arthrodeses. J Hand Surg [Am].
Between the first conversion to total arthrodesis in June 1994 and the last in June 2003, 597 midcarpal arthrodeses were performed.
There is ample evidence that many of the DBM products that are currently available are excellent graft substitutes especially when implanted into contained bone defects, fractures, or arthrodeses combined with stable internal fixation.