arteriovenous graft


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ar·te·ri·o·ve·nous graft

(ahr-tēŕē-ō-vēnŭs graft)
A synthetic tube that connects an artery to a vein.
References in periodicals archive ?
When should a patient receive an arteriovenous graft rather than a fstula?
Left common iliac artery to inferior vena cava abdominal wall arteriovenous graft for hemodialysis access.
A primary prevention measure is the avoidance of central lines in favor of arteriovenous fistulas or, in some instances, arteriovenous grafts. Currently, approximately 80% of ESRD patients in the United States initiate hemodialysis with a central line (11), a proportion that exceeded that of eight of 10 other developed countries and was nearly threefold higher than in Germany (23%) and Japan (29%) (19).
In addition, there were three cases of deep vein thrombosis (two in women taking HT and one in a patient on placebo), one patient had a stroke on HT, and one case of thrombosis occurred in an HT-group patient with an arteriovenous graft.
In addition, there were three cases of deep vein thrombosis (two in women taking hormone therapy and one in a patient on placebo); one patient had a stroke on hormone therapy, and one case of thrombosis occurred in a hormone therapy-group patient with an arteriovenous graft.
Thus, in this study, we tested the effects of CES in IH of vein grafts and explore its underlying mechanisms in a rabbit arteriovenous graft model.
Many patients have an arteriovenous graft, a strong, semi-permanent tube usually made of plastic or other synthetic material, implanted into their arm that allows access for large quantities of blood to be removed from the patient and filtered through the hemodialysis machine.
Data was collected on the type of access used for first HD, including temporary Central venous catheters (CVC), permanent CVC (Permacath), arteriovenous fistula (AVF), or arteriovenous graft (AVG).
Surgical procedures included spinal (33%), hepatic resection (14%), peripheral arterial bypass (23%), arteriovenous graft formation for hemodialysis access (18%), and skin graft after burn wound excision (12%).
The provision of a functioning vascular access for haemodialysis can in some cases be challenging and although the recommendations of the CARI (Caring for Australians with Renal Impairment, 2008) guidelines promote the use of a fistula first there exists a growing number of patients in whom an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or arteriovenous graft (AVG) cannot be placed.