arteriosclerosis


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arteriosclerosis

 [ahr-te″re-o-sklĕ-ro´sis]
any of a group of diseases characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the arterial walls; popularly called “hardening of the arteries.” Symptoms depend on the organ system involved. adj., adj arteriosclerot´ic.ƒ

There are three main forms of arteriosclerosis: (1) atherosclerosis, the most common type, in which plaques of fatty deposits form in the inner layer (tunica intima) of the arteries; (2) Mönckeberg's arteriosclerosis, called also medial calcific sclerosis because of involvement of the middle layer (tunica media) of the arteries, where there is destruction of muscle and elastic fibers and formation of calcium deposits; and (3) arteriolar sclerosis or arteriolosclerosis, which is marked by thickening of the walls of arterioles. All three forms may be present in the same patient, but in different blood vessels. When reference is made to hardening of the arteries, this usually refers to atherosclerosis; the terms arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis are often used interchangeably.

It is the responsibility of the health care provider to help individuals modify or eliminate from their lives risk factors for the development of arteriosclerosis. These include cigarette smoking, obesity, elevated cholesterol levels, and sedentary life style.
Mönckeberg's arteriosclerosis see arteriosclerosis.
arteriosclerosis obli´terans arteriosclerosis in which proliferation of the intima has caused complete obliteration of the lumen of the artery. Cf. endarteritis obliterans.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·te·ri·o·scle·ro·sis

(ar-tēr'ē-ō-skler-ō'sis),
Hardening of the arteries; types generally recognized are: atherosclerosis, Mönckeberg arteriosclerosis, and arteriolosclerosis.
[arterio- + G. sklērōsis, hardness]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arteriosclerosis

(är-tîr′ē-ō-sklə-rō′sĭs)
n.
Any of several chronic diseases, such as atherosclerosis, that are characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of the arteries and that lead to impaired blood circulation.

ar·te′ri·o·scle·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

arteriosclerosis

A group of diseases, more commonly affecting men over age 50, characterised by thickening and hardening of arterial walls due to accumulation of lipids, calcium and fibrosis, as well as loss of elasticity and narrowing of arterial lumina. ASHD’s early effects are in the lower extremities, with subtotal occlusion and decreased exercise tolerance.

Forms
▪ Arteriolosclerosis:
   – Benign—associated with hyaline arteriolosclerosis;
   – Malignant—associated with myofibroblast hyperplasia, “onion-skinning” of endothelial basement membrane, and deposit of fibrinoid material in vascular wall.
▪ Atherosclerosis—Formed by cholesterol and cholesterol esters, covered by a fibrous plaque which with time becomes calcified, ulcerated and causes thromboembolism in coronary artery disease (strokes, MIs, leg ischaemia, ischaemia of large intestine). 
▪ Mönckeberg sclerosis—Idiopathic and often asymptomatic annular calcified bands occurring in the muscular media of medium to small blood vessels of the extremities.
 
Risk factors
Personal or family history of coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease; diabetes; hypertension; kidney disease involving haemodialysis; smoking; obesity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

arteriosclerosis

ASHD, hardening of the arteries Cardiology ASHD's early effects are in the lower extremities, with subtotal occlusion and decreased ability to withstand exercise without frequent rest periods; atherosclerosis is a generic term for arterial 'hardening'–calcium deposition, sclerosis, and thickening by fibrous tissue with loss of elasticity forms of arteriosclerosis including atherosclerosis–in which there is lipid deposition, Mönckeberg sclerosis, arteriolosclerosis; it is a common disorder usually affecting > age 50 and refers to any of a group of diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the artery wall and in the narrowing of its lumen Risk factors Personal or family history of coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease, DM, HTN, kidney disease involving hemodialysis, smoking, or obesity. See Atherosclerosis, Hyaline arteriosclerosis.
Arteriosclerosis
Arteriolosclerosis
  • Benign–associated with hyaline arteriolosclerosis
  • Malignant–associated with myofibroblast hyperplasia, 'onion-skinning' of endothelial basement membrane and deposit of fibrinoid material in vascular wall
Atherosclerosis
Formed by cholesterol and cholesterol esters, covered by a fibrous plaque which, with time becomes calcified, ulcerated and causes thromboembolism in coronary artery disease–strokes, MIs, leg ischemia-especially in DM, ischemia of large intestine
Mönckeberg sclerosis
Idiopathic and often asymptomatic annular calcified bands occurring in the muscular media of medium to small blood vessels of the extremities that have been fancifully likened to a goose's neck
.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ar·te·ri·o·scle·ro·sis

(ahr-tēr'ē-ō-skler-ō'sis)
Hardening of the arteries; types generally recognized are: atherosclerosis, Mönckeberg arteriosclerosis, and arteriolosclerosis.
Synonym(s): arterial sclerosis.
[L. arteria, + G. sklērōsis, hardness]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arteriosclerosis

Hardening of the arteries. The term, once ubiquitous, has become imprecise and has virtually fallen out of use because pure arteriosclerosis is rare. It has been replaced by the term ATHEROSCLEROSIS, which more accurately describes the common degenerative disease of arteries. Pure arteriosclerosis may occur as a result of calcium deposition in the middle coat (media) of arteries, reducing their elasticity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

arteriosclerosis

a pathological condition or any of a group of diseases in which there is an increase in the thickness of the arterial walls, a reduction in elasticity of the vessel, and a constriction of diameter which affects the blood flow; the classic ‘hardening of the arteries’ of the elderly. See ATHEROMA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Arteriosclerosis

A chronic condition characterized by thickening and hardening of the arteries and the build-up of plaque on the arterial walls. Arteriosclerosis can slow or impair blood circulation.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

arteriosclerosis 

Thickening and hardening of the walls of arteries which results in an obstruction of the blood flow. It is most frequently the result of hypertension but in the elderly it can develop in the absence of hypertension. In the retina, the branches of the central retinal artery may become straightened at first, later they become lengthened and tortuous, the arteriovenous (A-V) crossings are abnormal. Arteries resemble 'copper wire' as they become infiltrated with lipid deposits and eventually as 'silver wire' as the deposits increase and the whole thickness of the artery appears as a bright white reflex. Some retinal oedema may be present and as the disease progresses there are retinal haemorrhages and small sharp-edged exudates without surrounding oedema. This retinal condition is called arteriosclerotic retinopathy. See atherosclerosis; anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy; hypertensive retinopathy; sphygmomanometer.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ar·te·ri·o·scle·ro·sis

(ahr-tēr'ē-ō-skler-ō'sis)
Hardening of the arteries; types generally recognized are: atherosclerosis, Mönckeberg arteriosclerosis, and arteriolosclerosis.
Synonym(s): arterial sclerosis.
[L. arteria, + G. sklērōsis, hardness]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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