arteriography


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arteriography

 [ahr-te″re-og´rah-fe]
angiography of an artery or arterial system.
catheter arteriography radiography of vessels after introduction of contrast material through a catheter inserted into an artery.
coronary arteriography angiography of the coronary arteries, in which a cardiac catheter is inserted into an artery, usually the femoral or brachial artery, advanced under fluoroscopic guidance, and used to inject contrast medium directly into the coronary orifices. It is most often used in evaluations of patients with angina pectoris, prior to coronary artery surgery or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.
selective arteriography radiography of a specific vessel that is opacified by a medium introduced directly into it, usually via a catheter.

ar·te·ri·og·ra·phy

(ar-tēr'ē-og'ră-fē),
Demonstration of an artery or arteries by x-ray imaging after injection of a radiopaque contrast medium.
[arterio- + G. graphō, to write]

arteriography

(är-tîr′ē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
Radiologic visualization of the arteries following injection of a radiopaque substance.

ar·te′ri·o·gram′ (-ə-grăm′) n.
ar·te′ri·o·graph′ic (-ə-grăf′ĭk) adj.

arteriography

The diagnostic imaging of an artery which, in the classic sense, is based on plain film imaging or so-called projectional imaging. The term now includes CT imaging of blood vessels (CT angiography) and MRI of blood vessels (MRI angiography), as well as isotope angiography, more correctly termed isotope perfusion. 

Angiography is commonly used as a synonym of arteriography, despite the fact that while all arteriography (imaging of arteries) is angiography (imaging of blood vessels), not all angiography is arteriography, given that  angiography also includes venography (imaging of veins).

arteriography

Imaging The visualization of arteries by injecting a radiocontrast into an artery suspected of having significant stenosis or occlusion–eg, affected by ASHD which, if untreated, may lead to infarction of a limb or organ, long-term disability, death Sites performed Carotid, coronary, femoral arteries; each may require surgical or medical–ie non-surgical therapy, if the artery is severely occluded.

ar·te·ri·og·ra·phy

(ahr-ter'ē-og'ră-fē)
Visualization of an artery or arteries by x-ray imaging after injection of a radiopaque contrast medium
See also: angiography
[arterio + G.graphō, to write]

arteriography

X-ray examination of arteries following injection of a radio-opaque dye. The same as ANGIOGRAPHY.

Arteriography

A medical test in which an x-ray visible dye is injected into blood vessels. This dye allows the blood vessels to be imaged with x rays.

ar·te·ri·og·ra·phy

(ahr-ter'ē-og'ră-fē)
Demonstration of an artery or arteries by x-ray imaging after injection of a radiopaque contrast medium.
[L. arteria, + G. graphō, to write]
References in periodicals archive ?
Berger, "Blunt lower-extremity trauma and popliteal artery injuries: revisiting the case for selective arteriography," Archives of Surgery, vol.
Caption: Figure 3: Arteriography of the aortoiliac intersection: endovascular prosthesis covered in place at the level of the right primitive iliac artery, a network of collateral arteries supplying the lower right limbs.
Volgas, "Vascular injuries in knee dislocations: the role of physical examination in determining the need for arteriography," The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery--American Volume, vol.
Other authors recommend the liberal use of arteriography. Nitecki et al advise liberal use of CTA, but this was in a combat setting.
Currently, coronary arteriography is not advocated to be performed on renal transplantation recipients in most hospitals.
Therefore, vascular assessment should include examination of both the dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses, ankle-brachial index measurement, and computerized tomography (CT) angiography or arteriography. The patient had no clinical signs of vascular and nerve injury at the time of admission and observation, so she did not urgently need further radiological study such as CT angiography (3, 4).
In view of the active bleeding in the thigh, it was decided to perform a selective arteriography, which identified the source of bleeding in a branch of the superficial femoral artery near the femoropopliteal junction.
According to the most recent review of the literature, selective arteriography is the most effective modality for diagnosis [4, 10].
These life-sized and enlarged 3D models were created in collaboration with the Boston Children's Hospital Simulator Program (SIMPeds) using brain magnetic resonance and MR arteriography data from each child.
A false or pseudo aneurysm is a rare complication of femoral artery puncture and presents as a pulsatile mass at the puncture site up to two weeks after arteriography as a result of communication between the lumen of the artery and a cavity within an organised haematoma (Chapman & Nakielny, 2007).
Specific procedures to document blockage of the vessels are a Doppler ultrasound of the extremity and angiography or arteriography. The Doppler will pick up the patency of blood flow sonically.