arterial occlusion


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Related to arterial occlusion: venous occlusion

arterial occlusion

A blockage of blood flow through an artery. It may be acute or chronic and occurs, for example, in coronary or in peripheral arteries. Patients with acute arterial occlusion have severe pain (as in angina pectoris), decreased or absent pulses, and mottling of the skin of an affected extremity. The occlusion is removed and blood flow restored if possible.
See also: occlusion
References in periodicals archive ?
It is important to increase the awareness about the risk of arterial occlusion and vascular events with Cisplatin-based chemotherapy, as this facilitates a better understanding of the patient's disease process and allows for improved future planning of care.
We also consider percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy a more physiological alternative treatment for arterial occlusions. When quick mechanical debulking is first performed and the thrombus is removed, the underlying lesion is usually significantly shorter than the length of the occlusion.
The NIRS signals recorded during exercise do not always reflect the absolute levels of intramuscular oxygenation, so the changes in the oxygenation of working skeletal muscles are expressed relative to the overall changes in the monitored signal according to the arterial occlusion method (Hamaoka et al., 2001).
[sup][12] We should be alert to treat patients with acute arterial occlusion of the extremities and to investigate the underlying cause of the embolism, including fungal vegetation from the involved heart valves as in the present case.
In contrast to acute arterial thrombosis which can be managed by thrombolytics, thrombectomy, end to end anastomosis, or bypass graft, chronic arterial occlusion can often be treated nonoperatively [4, 8].
SHAM: rats submitted to surgery without arterial occlusion; ISCH: rats submitted to ischemia-reperfusion surgery; EXERC: rats submitted to physical exercise before surgery without arterial occlusion; EXERC-ISCH: rats submitted to physical exercise before ischemia-reperfusion surgery.
Historically, the terms peripheral arterial disease (PAD), peripheral vascular disease, and chronic arterial occlusion have been used interchangeably.
Triphasic and biphasic sounds indicate normal flow, while a monophasic sound and or lowering of the sound pitch indicates arterial occlusion (Lorimer, D.