arterial blood gas


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Related to arterial blood gas: Venous Blood Gas

arterial blood gas

n.
The concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, whose partial pressures are measured along with other factors such as blood pH in order to assess oxygen saturation and other metabolic indicators in patients, especially those with respiratory disorders.

arterial blood gas

Critical care Analysis of arterial blood for O2, CO2, bicarbonate content, and pH, which reflects the functional effectiveness of lung function and to monitor respiratory therapy Ref range pO2, 75-100 mm Hg; pCO2, 35-45 mm Hg; pH: 7.35-7.42, O2 content: 15-23%; O2 saturation, 94-100%; HCO3, 22-26 mEq/L. See Metabolic acidosis, Metabolic alkalosis, Respiratory acidosis, Respiratory alkalosis.

arterial blood gas

Abbreviation: ABG
Any of the gases present in blood. Operationally and clinically, ABGs include the determination of levels of pH, oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the blood. ABGs are important in the diagnosis and treatment of disturbances of acid-base balance, pulmonary disease, electrolyte balance, and oxygen delivery. Values of the gases themselves are usually expressed as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide or oxygen although derived values are reported in other units. Several other blood chemistry values are important in managing acid-base disturbances, including the levels of the bicarbonate ion (HCO3), blood pH, sodium, potassium, and chloride.
See also: gas
References in periodicals archive ?
A comparison of central venous and arterial blood gas values in the critically ill.
Evidence is conflicting in human medicine regarding the suitability of replacing arterial blood gas analysis with venous blood gas analysis in emergency cases.
compared arterial blood gas analysis with oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry in the assessment of acute asthma.
However, missing data from the arterial blood gas analysis from patients with Hb Aalborg has never been reported previously.
Compared with the control group, seawater exposure caused significant changes in the arterial blood gas parameters, which was manifested by an obvious decrease in Pa[O.sub.2] and pH value, as well as a significant increase in PaC[O.sub.2] (Figure 1).
When using plastic syringes, the arterial blood gas analysis should be processed shortly after the sample is collected.
Comparison of capillary and arterial blood gas measurements in neonates.
Topics include chest radiograph, electrocardiographs and arterial blood gas interpretation, practice scenarios, fluid management, haemodynamic monitoring, shock, airway management and oxygen therapies.
Arterial blood gas showed no evidence of hypoxia or acidosis.
The first arterial blood gas was done within 10 minutes of ventilator treatment in 48 (81%) of the cases, whereas the second was done within 90 minutes in 41 (69.5%) of the cases.
Arterial blood gas (ABG), carbon-monoxide level (smokers) and acetylene tests may be indicated in some cases.
When its concentration is elevated in red blood cells, pulse oximetry readings report lower measured oxygen saturation than those calculated from arterial blood gas readings (10 & 11)