artefact


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artifact

 [ahr´tĭ-fakt]
1. any artificial product; a structure or appearance that is not natural, but is due to manipulation.
2. distortion or fuzziness of an image caused by manipulation, such as during compression of a digital file.
film artifact artificial images on x-ray films due to storage, handling, or processing.
phantom artifact artificial images seen with conventional tomography.
standardization artifact an electrical stimulus of 1 mV deliberately introduced into the electrocardiogram so that pulse amplitudes on the tracing can be adjusted to 10 mm. The amplitudes of the P, QRS, and T intervals can be accurately evaluated only on an electrocardiogram thus standardized.

ar·ti·fact

(ar'ti-fakt),
1. Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record, which is caused by the technique used and does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, as in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

(är′tə-făkt′)
n.
Variant of artifact.

artefact

(1) A structure not normally present, but produced by some external action; something artificial.
(2) The distortion of a substance or signal which interferes with or obscures the interpretation of a study, or a structure that is not representative of a specimen’s in vivo state, or which does not reflect the original sample, but rather is the result of an isolation procedure, its handling or other factors. Artefacts in electronic readout devices (e.g., EEG, EKG, and EMG) may be due to loose leads or electrical contacts.
 
Cardiology
An electrical impulse of noncardiac origin which is recorded as a vertical spike on an EKG or other ECG monitor (e.g., a pacemaker pulse); electrical signals from muscle contractions, or myopotentials, are called muscle artefacts.
 
Histology
Any change in tissue that occurs during tissue processing which may alter a tissue’s appearance and possibly the diagnosis.

Imaging
The artefact seen depends on the procedure. For example, in a barium enema, where zones of inconstant segmental contractions of the colon may be confused with organic constrictions or anatomic variations due to mucosal or intramural tumours, or a metal surgical clip that obscures an anatomical structure.

ar·ti·fact

(ahr'ti-fakt)
1. Anything (especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record) that is caused by the technique used or is not a natural occurrence but is merely incidental.
2. A skin lesion produced or perpetuated by self-inflicted action, such as scratching in dermatitis artefacta.
Synonym(s): artefact.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]

artefact

something that appears during preparation or examination of material which is not present in the natural state. Two scientists from the University of Surrey, Harold Hillman and Peter Sartory, have suggested on the evidence provided by solid geometry, that some structures described by electron microscopy, e.g. Golgi apparatus, nuclear pores, endoplasmic reticulum, are artefacts of the preparation of material.

artefact 

Anything made or introduced artificially which misleads the results of an investigation, image or test. Example: in visual evoked cortical potentials, any wave that has its origin elsewhere than in the visual area.

ar·ti·fact

, artefact (ahr'ti-fakt)
Anything, especially in a histologic specimen or a graphic record or x-ray, caused by the technique used that does not reflect the original specimen or experiment.
[L. ars, art, + facio, pp. factus, to make]
References in periodicals archive ?
The study conducted at the Universitat Rovira i Virgili and the Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution (IPHES) is based on burnt artefacts found in the Moli del Salt site in Tarragona, Spain.
The suspect who, by that time had sold the artefact, was arrested.
Simon's distinction between inner and outer environment points to two different ways of looking at technical artefacts. Looked upon from the outer environment, the technical artefact presents itself primarily as something, whatever its inner environment, that fulfils a certain goal, purpose or function.
A few examples of artefact abundance in archaeological sites in eastern Australia will illustrate that assemblage composition is often dependent on the size of the sample.
Dipert shows that it can be accommodated comfortably, and intelligibly, in artefact theory.
The last section will showcase how the artefact is placed in its final resting place as part of the museum's permanent collection.
Further work is required on artefact function, but our preliminary hypothesis is that the dark smears and small starch granules are associated with a resin haft.
* Lightly Weathered 1 (LW1) artefact surfaces are mid-grey (10YR 5/1), smooth, lustrous, with the appearance of a white film over the surface.
The artefacts were mainly received after local residents found them and handed them over to the museum.
The artefacts from Pakistan had generated great interest among the visitors of the exhibition and depicts civilizational history, art and culture.
'Contractors should not be desperate to sell objects or artefacts found on sites to the rich in the society.