art therapist


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art therapist

a human service professional who uses art media and images, the creative process, and client responses to artwork in order to assess, treat, and rehabilitate patients with mental, emotional, physical, or developmental disorders. Through art, the therapist attempts to help the client access and express memories, trauma, and psychic conflict often not easily reached with words.
References in periodicals archive ?
A newly qualified art therapist in the NHS can earn between pounds 23,000 and pounds 31,000 a year rising to around pounds 36,000 with experience.
On Monday, the art therapist leads the group in a variety of "failure-free" art projects, the products of which cover the walls of the program room.
Once their work of art is completed, residents talk about it with their art therapist and in front of a group.
Process, not product" is a phrase dear to many art therapists working with children who are developmentally delayed.
Mourning, memory, and life itself; essays by an art therapist.
It provides 25 alphabetical chapters on occupations in the field of human services, from activities therapist and art therapist through substance abuse counselor and vocational rehabilitation counselor.
This reference contains information on 8,000 accredited educational programs in 77 health care professions, from art therapist to veterinary technologist.
Art psychotherapist Junge and her student coauthor Newall explore the experience of becoming an art therapist.
With therapists, counselors, social workers, youth workers, and teachers in mind, Barber, an art therapist who teaches at City U.
Psychologist and registered art therapist Lisa Hinz describes an art-based approach that mental health professionals can use with clients who have eating disorders.
Each chapter reflects the expertise of the art therapist who wrote it.
Psychotherapist and art therapist Jeong traces the treatment of mental issues throughout recorded Korean history and explores traditional Korean thoughts, beliefs, and values as the backbone of therapy.