arsenic

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arsenic

 (As) [ahr´sĕ-nik]
a chemical element, atomic number 33, atomic weight 74.92. (See Appendix 6.) It is toxic by inhalation or ingestion, and carcinogenic (see arsenic poisoning). In nature it occurs usually as one of its salts; in human environments it is often a pollutant in mining regions, and is used in dyes, household pesticides, and compounds used in agriculture. Arsenic compounds called arsenicals were formerly widely used in medicine.
arsenic poisoning poisoning due to systemic exposure to inorganic pentavalent arsenic. Arsenic is cumulative, storing permanently in hair, nails, and bone, and children are particularly susceptible. Arsenic is odorless and flavorless and has been found in elevated levels in the drinking water that flows through arsenic-rich rocks, leading to serious health problems in some countries. The antidote for arsenic poisoning is dimercaprol. Acute arsenic poisoning, which may result in shock and death, is marked by skin eruptions, swelling of eyelids and limbs, vomiting, diarrhea, and cramps. Chronic arsenic poisoning (called also arsenism), due to ingestion of small amounts over a long period of time, is marked by skin pigmentation with scaling, keratosis of the palms and soles, white lines on the fingernails, peripheral neuropathy, and confusion.
arsenic trioxide an oxidized form of arsenic, used in weed killers and rodenticides. It is also administered intravenously as an antineoplastic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·se·nic (As),

(ar'sĕ-nik),
1. A metallic element, atomic no. 33, atomic wt. 74.92159; forms a number of poisonous compounds, some of which are used in medicine.
2. Denoting the element arsenic or one of its compounds, especially arsenic acid.
Synonym(s): arsenium, ratsbane
[L. arsenicum, G. arsenikon, fr. Pers. zarnik]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arsenic

A metallic element (atomic number 33, atomic weight 74.92) which has been linked to deficiency states in some plants and animals. It has no known physiologic role in humans, and is extremely toxic in more than trace amounts.
Reference range Hair/nails <1.0 µg/g; urine <50 µg/24 hours. Excretion in occupationally exposed individuals ranges from 50 to 5000 µg/24 hours.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·se·nic

(As) (ahr'sĕ-nik)
A metallic element, atomic no. 33, atomic wt. 74.92159; forms a number of poisonous compounds, some of which are used in medicine.
[L. arsenicum, G. arsenikon, fr. Pers. zarnik]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arsenic

A metallic element some of whose compounds are violently poisonous. Formerly widely used in insecticides and weed killers and in various industrial processes.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

arsenic

a chemical element in the form of a grey metal, more familiar in the extremely poisonous form of arsenious trioxide. It was at one time used in arsenical soap for the preservation of animal and bird skins in museums, so that particular care should be taken in handling old museum skins.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Concentrations of arsenic species ([micro]g/L) in urine samples collected from a subject before and after the administration of 300 mg DMPS.
We have further analyzed arsenic species in another set of urine samples from people in Romania (29).
The samples we used in this study had been stored at -20 [degrees] C for 1-6 months before arsenic speciation analyses.
Biomethylation is commonly assumed to be the main process of detoxifying arsenic (2-6) because the metabolites usually observed in urine, MMA(V) and DMA(V), are less acutely toxic and more readily excreted in urine than the inorganic arsenic species.
Enzymatic methylation of arsenic species and other new approaches to arsenic toxicity.
Metabolism of arsenic. In: Biological and Environmental Effects of Arsenic (Fowler BA, ed).
Comparison of the urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites after a single dose of sodium arsenite, monomethylarsonate or dimethylarsinate in man.
Biochemical toxicology of arsenic. Rev Biochem Toxicol 10:265-299 (1989).
In: Arsenic in the Environment, Part II: Human Health and Ecosystem Effects (Nriagu JO, ed).
Biological mechanisms and toxicological consequences of the methylation of arsenic. In: Toxicology of Metals - Biochemical Aspects, Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology (Goyer RA, Cherian G, eds).
Dimethylarsinic acid treatment alters six different rat biochemical parameters: relevance to arsenic carcinogenesis.
Complexation of arsenic species in rabbit erythrocytes.