arsenical


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arsenical

 [ahr-sen´ĭ-k'l]
1. pertaining to arsenic.
2. a compound containing arsenic; arsenicals were once widely used in medicine, but have now mostly been replaced by antibiotics. However, some are still used to treat infectious diseases, especially those caused by protozoa, as well as skin disorders and blood dyscrasias; they must be administered with caution because of their toxicity. All arsenicals are toxic to humans and some are carcinogenic. See also arsenic poisoning.

ar·sen·i·cal

(ar-sen'i-kăl),
1. A drug or agent, the effect of which depends on its arsenic content.
2. Denoting or containing arsenic.

arsenical

(är-sĕn′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
Of or containing arsenic.
n.
A drug or preparation containing arsenic.

ar·sen·i·cal

(ahr-sen'i-kăl)
1. Denoting or containing arsenic.
2. A drug or agent, the effect of which depends on its arsenic content.
3. A class of chemical agents that contain arsenic.

arsenical

1. pertaining to arsenic.
2. a compound containing arsenic.

arsenical herbicide
includes monosodium or disodium methanearsonates. See also organic arsenical (below).
organic arsenical
includes aliphatic organic arsenicals, e.g. the pharmaceuticals cacodylic and phenarsonic acids, the herbicides monosodium and disodium methanearsonates, aromatic organic arsenicals, e.g. trivalent phenylorganic arsenicals like thiacetarsamide, arsphencomplexamine, and pentavalent phenylorganic arsenicals like arsanilic acid, roxarsone, nitarsone. Poisoning by organic arsenicals causes blindness and incoordination or restlessness, convulsions, incoordination, screaming. Recovery is spontaneous if the toxin is discontinued but some piglets may remain blind.
arsenical pyrites
an arsenic-rich ore.
arsenical sheepdip, cattledip
usually contains arsenic and sulfur with 20% soluble arsenic and 3% insoluble arsenious sulfide.
arsenical smoke
factory smoke effluent from processes using arsenic-rich ores may pollute local pasture with arsenic trioxide.
arsenical weedkiller
contains sodium or potassium arsenite or thioarsenites. They may contain up to 40% arsenic trioxide.
References in periodicals archive ?
V], methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenical compounds
In another cross-sectional study, conduced in Bangladesh, 430 out of 1,481 subjects aged [greater than or equal to] 30 yr and drinking arsenic contaminated water were found to have arsenical skin lesions.
This system measures only those arsenicals capable of giving volatile arsines, and thus can provide useful information (9).
For the conventional, conventional with no known arsenical policy, and positive nitarsone detection sample categories, MA exposure accounted for the largest contribution for a single species; for the other categories, DMA contributed the most to exposure.
Lines represent the geometric mean ratio of urinary arsenical concentrations by levels of poultry intake (grams/kilogram body weight/day), based on restricted quadratic spline models with knots at the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of natural log-transformed poultry intake (left y-axis).
10 In our patient, there was chronic exposure to arsenic with development of many features of arsenical keratoses and subsequent development of testicular cancer.
Key words Arsenic, arsenical keratoses, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
The majority of studies investigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), from benign steatosis to end-stage liver disease in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), have principally focused on arsenical exposures in parts per million ranges.