arsenical


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arsenical

 [ahr-sen´ĭ-k'l]
1. pertaining to arsenic.
2. a compound containing arsenic; arsenicals were once widely used in medicine, but have now mostly been replaced by antibiotics. However, some are still used to treat infectious diseases, especially those caused by protozoa, as well as skin disorders and blood dyscrasias; they must be administered with caution because of their toxicity. All arsenicals are toxic to humans and some are carcinogenic. See also arsenic poisoning.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·sen·i·cal

(ar-sen'i-kăl),
1. A drug or agent, the effect of which depends on its arsenic content.
2. Denoting or containing arsenic.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arsenical

(är-sĕn′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
Of or containing arsenic.
n.
A drug or preparation containing arsenic.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ar·sen·i·cal

(ahr-sen'i-kăl)
1. Denoting or containing arsenic.
2. A drug or agent, the effect of which depends on its arsenic content.
3. A class of chemical agents that contain arsenic.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In another cross-sectional study, conduced in Bangladesh, 430 out of 1,481 subjects aged [greater than or equal to] 30 yr and drinking arsenic contaminated water were found to have arsenical skin lesions.
In this way, only those arsenicals giving volatile arsines were detected.
Speciated arsenic testing is performed to look for [MMA.sup.III] and [DMA.sup.V], methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenical compounds
For iAs, we also estimated the difference in iAs intake for consumers of turkey produced with nitarsone compared with consumers of turkey produced without nitarsone by subtracting the mean iAs concentration for the antibiotic-free or USDA-certified Organic group from the mean iAs concentration for the "conventional with no known arsenical policy" group.
Lines represent the geometric mean ratio of urinary arsenical concentrations by levels of poultry intake (grams/kilogram body weight/day), based on restricted quadratic spline models with knots at the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of natural log-transformed poultry intake (left y-axis).
It is suspected to cause visceral cancers.9 Arsenic may play a role in testicular cancer.10 In our patient, there was chronic exposure to arsenic with development of many features of arsenical keratoses and subsequent development of testicular cancer.
From 1999, the European Union ceased the use of arsenicals as feed additives (European Commission 1999).
Arsenical keratoses of arms, dorsal sides of hands and feet were treated by topical retinoic acid.
The majority of studies investigating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), from benign steatosis to end-stage liver disease in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), have principally focused on arsenical exposures in parts per million ranges.
Similarly the premalignant and malignant conditions associated with the horns7,8 include adenoacanthoma, actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, arsenical keratosis, Paget's disease, Kaposi sarcoma, malignant melanoma, sebaceous carcinoma9 and squamous cell carcinoma.
Arsenical concentrations in drinking water and urine that were below their respective LODs were assigned a value equal to the LOD divided by the square root of 2.