arsenate


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arsenate

an uncommon garden pesticide, as lead arsenate, or as antifungal spray on fruit trees or cattle tick dip as sodium arsenate. Relatively insoluble but will cause arsenic poisoning but less toxic than arsenite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: Arsenate reducing bacteria, Klebsiella oxytoca, Citrobacter freundii, Bacillus anthracis, bioremediation.
1972) described the zinc arsenate from Aghbar as dark yellow-green crusts and pale yellow spherules in quartz and dolomite cavities.
Moreover, the presence of arsenate induced the increase in Zn(II) adsorption.
The arsC gene reduces arsenate to a more toxic compound called arsenite, but only in leaves.
When detectable PMM activity was determined in the presence of arsenate, partial inhibition was also observed.
that arsenate ion can exchange with the phosphate group in bezoar brushite, and thus be effectively removed from solution.
Specific analytical methods exist for well-known poisons such as cyanide, and elemental techniques can be used for metallic anions such as arsenate (Moffat 1986; Tanaka et al.
Additional substances rejected by the National Organic Standards Board but permissible according to the USDA rule are strychnine, potassium nitrate, piperonyl butoxide, copper-chromium arsenate, and the crop antibiotic avermectin.
1993) and Silene vulgaris by Schat and Ten Bookum (1992a) and for arsenate tolerance in Holcus lanatus by Macnair et al.
DDT displaced the more toxic and persistent lead arsenate.
The most common of the waterborne preservatives is chromated copper arsenate or CCA.
inorganic arsenicals and other water-borne preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA) are toxic to wood destroying fungi and insects, but leave a relatively clean and paintable surface and little or no odor.