aromatic

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Related to aromaticity: Aromatic compounds

aromatic

 [ar″o-mat´ik]
1. having a spicy fragrance.
2. denoting a compound containing a ring system stabilized by a closed circle of conjugated double bonds or nonbonding electron pairs, e.g., benzene or naphthalene.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·o·mat·ic

(ar'ō-mat'ik),
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
3.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aromatic

(ăr′ə-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Having an aroma; fragrant or sweet-smelling: aromatic herbs.
2. Chemistry Of, relating to, or containing one or more molecular ring structures having properties of stability and reactivity characteristic of benzene.
n.
1. An aromatic plant or substance, such as a medication.
2. Chemistry An aromatic organic compound.

ar′o·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
ar′o·mat′ic·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant (usually understood to be pleasant) odour due to the presence of volatile oils.
 
noun A general term for herbal medicines with a fragrant odour, many of which are said to be mild stimulants.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant–usually due to the presence of volatile oils noun A general term for an herbal medicine with a fragrant odor, many of which are said to be mild stimulants. See Aromatics®, Aromatherapy, Herbal medicine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

aromatic

Of a class of chemical compounds originally so named because many of them have a fragrant smell derived from benzene. Today, by extension, the term is used to refer to compounds containing one or more structures of the pattern of benzene-a ring of six carbon atoms with alternate single and double bonds. The female sex hormones and many drugs contain aromatic rings. Compounds that contain no rings or rings that are not benzene rings are said to be aliphatic.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared to [beta]-1 and [beta]-2, [beta]-3 has the highest aromaticity and most aliphatic chain [Table-4 and Fig.
(2) Comparing the adsorption mechanism of the two kinds of DOM, it was found that the PDOM has high aromaticity, low hydrophilicity, and polarity because it consists of humus-like substances, leading to an easier combination with the sediment, so as to increase the number of adsorption sites and promote the adsorption of OTC.
Foroutan-Nejad, "Interatomic magnetizability: a QTAIM-based approach toward deciphering magnetic aromaticity," The Journal of Physical Chemistry A, vol.
The four chapters in this brief collection address research in aromaticity and indices for the measurement thereof.
The various values of the aromaticity index show that an influence of even a small amount of plastic/rubber admixtures on tar properties is considerable.
Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils is very complex and represents a large spectrum of ionic polymers consisting of specific low and high molecular weight (MW) compounds varying in chemical composition, aromaticity and functional groups (Chin et al.
Triazole is a quite important heterocyclic five membered ring and possesses aromaticity and rich electrons.
Aliphaticity and aromaticity of in silico predicted and characterized nitrilases were differentiated based on their physiochemical properties.
The topics include spinning carbon nanotube fibers using the floating catalyst high-temperature route: purity issues and the critical role of sulphur, whether maximum aromaticity or maximum pentagon separation is the origin behind the stability of endohedral metallofullerenes, aqueous dispersions of oligomer-grafted carbon nanomaterials with controlled surface charge and minimal framework damage, gel electrophoresis using a selective radical for separating single-walled carbon nanotubes, and reducing graphene oxide and graphene composite materials to improve gas sensing at low temperatures.
In the humification processes, biopolymers are broken into small fragments and randomly combined into humic precursors with different sizes and degrees of aromaticity. Given that a long period of time and adequate conditions of humidity and temperature are provided, drastic structural modifications occur and three main classes of humic substances are produced: humines, humic acids, and fulvic acids [1].