aromatic

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Related to aromaticity: Aromatic compounds

aromatic

 [ar″o-mat´ik]
1. having a spicy fragrance.
2. denoting a compound containing a ring system stabilized by a closed circle of conjugated double bonds or nonbonding electron pairs, e.g., benzene or naphthalene.

ar·o·mat·ic

(ar'ō-mat'ik),
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
3.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

/ar·o·mat·ic/ (ar″o-mat´ik)
1. having a spicy odor.
2. in chemistry, denoting a compound containing a ring system stabilized by a closed circle of conjugated double bonds or nonbonding electron pairs, e.g., benzene or naphthalene.

aromatic

(ăr′ə-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Having an aroma; fragrant or sweet-smelling: aromatic herbs.
2. Chemistry Of, relating to, or containing one or more molecular ring structures having properties of stability and reactivity characteristic of benzene.
n.
1. An aromatic plant or substance, such as a medication.
2. Chemistry An aromatic organic compound.

ar′o·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
ar′o·mat′ic·ness n.

aromatic

[er′ōmat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, aroma, spice
1 pertaining to a strong but agreeable odor such as a pleasant spicy odor.
2 a stimulant or spicy medicine.
3 pertaining to organic chemical structures including a 6-carbon ring such as benzol.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant (usually understood to be pleasant) odour due to the presence of volatile oils.
 
noun A general term for herbal medicines with a fragrant odour, many of which are said to be mild stimulants.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant–usually due to the presence of volatile oils noun A general term for an herbal medicine with a fragrant odor, many of which are said to be mild stimulants. See Aromatics®, Aromatherapy, Herbal medicine.

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

Of a class of chemical compounds originally so named because many of them have a fragrant smell derived from benzene. Today, by extension, the term is used to refer to compounds containing one or more structures of the pattern of benzene-a ring of six carbon atoms with alternate single and double bonds. The female sex hormones and many drugs contain aromatic rings. Compounds that contain no rings or rings that are not benzene rings are said to be aliphatic.

aromatic,

n an organic compound derived from benzene. Also called an
aromatic compound.

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

1. having a spicy fragrance.
2. a stimulant, spicy medicine.
3. denoting a compound containing a resonance-stabilized ring, e.g. benzene or naphthalene.

aromatic diamidines
some are useful babesiocides, e.g. imidocarb, amicarbalide, phenamidine.
aromatic organic arsenicals
includes thiacetarsamide, arsphencomplexamine, arsanilic acid, roxarsone, nitarsone.
References in periodicals archive ?
254] increased twofold, reflecting an increase in DOM aromaticity under moderately reducing compared with oxic conditions (Fig.
13]C NMR spectroscopy were used for HA aromaticity degree calculation.
The presence of organic structures of high aromaticity was observed in the correlation between the thermogravimetry data and EPR, where a significant positive correlation between the concentration of the semiquinone-type free radicals (spin/g of C) and the thermal decomposition values at >350[degrees]C were detected.
asymmetric and symmetric bands are relatively more intense in the extracted DOM resulting from combustion at the higher temperature leading to more polar residues, which tend to offset any increase in aromaticity that may have occurred.
bar]H]), formal charge on ether oxygen atoms (qo), electrophilicity index ([omega]), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity index ([I.
In the 34 chapters, they cover various aspects of DFT and their connections to a chemical reactivity theory, including basic ground-state DFT and its extensions to time-dependent systems, excited states, and spin-polarized molecules, bonding, interactions, reactivity, dynamics, toxicity, aromaticity, and key global and local reactivity descriptors and their variations under different perturbations.
The goal of this project was to synthesize the transition metallaaromatic compound titananthracene in order to study the fundamental concept of aromaticity and how it applies to this class of metallacycles.
After this period, heptane was added to adjust the solvent to the appropriate degree of aromaticity.
For describing the systems, analogy with benzene [pi]-bonding and aromaticity has been used, which in the case of carboranes is expressed as [sigma]-aromaticity [3].
The reason for this difference has to do with loss of aromaticity in the benzene ring adjacent to the dicarbonyl groups.