aromatic

(redirected from aromaticity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to aromaticity: Aromatic compounds

aromatic

 [ar″o-mat´ik]
1. having a spicy fragrance.
2. denoting a compound containing a ring system stabilized by a closed circle of conjugated double bonds or nonbonding electron pairs, e.g., benzene or naphthalene.

ar·o·mat·ic

(ar'ō-mat'ik),
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
3.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

/ar·o·mat·ic/ (ar″o-mat´ik)
1. having a spicy odor.
2. in chemistry, denoting a compound containing a ring system stabilized by a closed circle of conjugated double bonds or nonbonding electron pairs, e.g., benzene or naphthalene.

aromatic

(ăr′ə-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Having an aroma; fragrant or sweet-smelling: aromatic herbs.
2. Chemistry Of, relating to, or containing one or more molecular ring structures having properties of stability and reactivity characteristic of benzene.
n.
1. An aromatic plant or substance, such as a medication.
2. Chemistry An aromatic organic compound.

ar′o·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
ar′o·mat′ic·ness n.

aromatic

[er′ōmat′ik]
Etymology: Gk, aroma, spice
1 pertaining to a strong but agreeable odor such as a pleasant spicy odor.
2 a stimulant or spicy medicine.
3 pertaining to organic chemical structures including a 6-carbon ring such as benzol.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant (usually understood to be pleasant) odour due to the presence of volatile oils.
 
noun A general term for herbal medicines with a fragrant odour, many of which are said to be mild stimulants.

aromatic

adjective Referring to a substance with a fragrant–usually due to the presence of volatile oils noun A general term for an herbal medicine with a fragrant odor, many of which are said to be mild stimulants. See Aromatics®, Aromatherapy, Herbal medicine.

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

Of a class of chemical compounds originally so named because many of them have a fragrant smell derived from benzene. Today, by extension, the term is used to refer to compounds containing one or more structures of the pattern of benzene-a ring of six carbon atoms with alternate single and double bonds. The female sex hormones and many drugs contain aromatic rings. Compounds that contain no rings or rings that are not benzene rings are said to be aliphatic.

aromatic,

n an organic compound derived from benzene. Also called an
aromatic compound.

ar·o·mat·ic

(arō-matik)
1. Having an agreeable, somewhat pungent, spicy odor.
2. One of a group of vegetable-based drugs having a fragrant odor and slightly stimulant properties.
[G. arōmatikos, fr. arōma, spice, sweet herb]

aromatic

1. having a spicy fragrance.
2. a stimulant, spicy medicine.
3. denoting a compound containing a resonance-stabilized ring, e.g. benzene or naphthalene.

aromatic diamidines
some are useful babesiocides, e.g. imidocarb, amicarbalide, phenamidine.
aromatic organic arsenicals
includes thiacetarsamide, arsphencomplexamine, arsanilic acid, roxarsone, nitarsone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dispersed phase is made up of a copolyester with a lower degree of aromaticity (51.
Furthermore, the HAs bound to Ca had increased aromaticity and C condensation, increased substituent carboxyl groups, and decreased substituent amino acids.
2, the slope of the curves increases markedly with the decrease of the LCP's degree of aromaticity.
Zech W, Haumaier L, Kogel-Knabner I (1989) Changes in aromaticity and carbon distribution of soil organic matter due to pedogenesis.
The new surface morphology was induced by amorphization, loss of aromaticity, and increased molecular stereo-irregularity.
Comparison of the aromatic carbon concentrations of the fractions and their proportions given in Table 1 shows that the overall aromaticity of the total products decreased with increasing oxidation severity, in agreement with the proposal that hydrogen peroxide oxidation not only leads to the formation of acid groups by cleavage of inter-ring bonds but also to the destruction of aromatic rings (Miura et al.
A quantitative measure of the increased aromaticity is expressed in terms of the (phenylene-H):ethylene-H peak area ratio.
2001) showed that despite a large decline in organic C in a Vertisol following many years of cropping, charcoal C remained relatively constant resulting in increased aromaticity of the organic fraction.
In general, increasing aromaticity in the backbone increased the thermal stability, and increasing the amount of aliphatic groups on side chains decreased the amount of char residue.
However, in other Vertosols (high in smectitic clay), Skjemstad and Dalal (1987) observed that besides the association of SOM with clay, SOM stability against decomposition in these soils may be due to increased aromaticity (aryl-C), possibly charcoal (Skjemstad et al.