aromatases

aromatases

A class of enzymes that can act on steroids to produce aromatic rings. All the sex hormones are four-ring structures. The first of the four rings of an oestrogen steroid (the A ring) is aromatic; that of the androgens is not. Aromatases catalyze the desaturation of steroid A rings, so can convert androgens to oestrogens. See also AROMATASE INHIBITOR.
References in periodicals archive ?
Melatonin is an indoleamine derived from the serotonin secreted during darkness that acts as a natural inhibitor of the aromatases (Hafez and Hafez, 2003).
The biosynthesis of estrogen is performed by the aromatase enzyme by the process of conversion or aromatization of androgens (C19) to estrogens (C18).
Aromatase is directly linked to folliculogenesis, affecting oocyte quality.
For example, using radiolabeled testosterone as an in vitro substrate for recombinant porcine enzyme, porcine aromatases were found to produce 17[beta]-estradiol and 19-nortestosterone as principal products, but in different ratios.
The planetary biology of cytochrome P450 aromatases.
ABSTRACT: Cytochrome P450 aromatase is responsible for the biosynthesis of estrogen.
It will be the challenge to design more specific inhibitors of fungal sterol 14[alpha]-demethylases that do not affect animal sterol 14[alpha]-demethylases and aromatases.
Aromatase is responsible for the physiologic balance of androgens and estrogens.
Aromatase is another target enzyme of azole compounds.
Nevertheless, both our assays and previous assays detected aromatase inhibitory properties for chrysin, biochanin A, and naringenin, whereas genistein was not an aromatase inhibitor in any of the assays using human aromatases (3,22).
The aromatase that converts testosterone to 17[beta]-estradiol is a possible target.
Key words: aromatase inhibitors, endocrine disruptors, estrogenicity, phytoestrogens, U-shaped dose-response curves.