aromatase


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aromatase

 [ah-ro´mah-tās]
an enzyme activity occurring in the endoplasmic reticulum and catalyzing the conversion of testosterone to the aromatic compound estradiol.

aromatase

(ə-rō′mə-tāz′, -tāz′)
n.
A key enzyme in the biosynthesis of steroids, especially in the conversion of androgens to estrogens.

CYP19A1

A gene on chromosome 15q21.1 that encodes a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes, which catalyse reactions involved in drug metabolism and synthesis of cholesterol, steroids and other lipids. CYP19A1 localises to the endoplasmic reticulum and catalyses the last steps of oestrogen biosynthesis—three successive hydroxylations of the A ring of androgens.

Molecular pathology
CYP19A1 mutations can up- or downregulate aromatase activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
carpio significantly accounted for suppressed E2 level which consequently elevated T level suggesting that aromatase based sex determination occurs in Nile tilapia and common carp.
Hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women is treated increasingly with aromatase inhibitors because of increased efficacy and reduced incidence of endometrial cancer compared with tamoxifen.
It's the ever-increasing insulin signal that activates the aromatase enzyme, making more and more testosterone turn into estrogen.
In the present study, masculinization of undifferentiated yellow catfish was induced by administration of the aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozol (LZ).
Several patients with recurrent disease demonstrated normalisation of their serum inhibin, decrease in tumour size, and an increase in disease-free survival.4 Several authors have recommended aromatase inhibitors as a treatment strategy for recurrent and refractory disease.1,7
A randomised trial comparing two doses of the new selective aromatase inhibitor anastrozole (Arimidex) with megestrol acetate in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer.
The findings suggest that vitamin D supplementation at doses higher than the standard of 400-800 IU/day might be useful to minimize bone loss in women starting out on aromatase inhibitors and who are not eligible for bisphosphonate therapy according to current guidelines.
Lack of complete cross-resistance between different aromatase inhibitors; a real finding in search for an explanation?
White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporous) are a potential chemopreventive agent against breast cancer and prostate cancer, as they suppress aromatase and steroid reductase, and inhibit the proliferation of breast and prostate cancer cells.
Chen began investigating mushrooms because his lab's studies found that ingredients in the mushrooms suppressed the effects of a natural substance in the body called aromatase. Blocking aromatase is a key way that physicians reduce circulating estrogen levels among their postmenopausal patients.
For this reason, anti-estrogen drugs such as tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors have come to the forefront in the fight against hormone-dependent breast cancer.