Araceae

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Araceae

the plant family of aroids (arums) which can be highly irritant when chewed because of a high content of oxalate as raphide crystals. Genera include Arum, Dieffenbachia, Philodendron, Monstera, Zantedeschia, Arisaema, Xanthosma, Lysichiton.
References in periodicals archive ?
A conspicuous aroid in mesic temperate forests of North America is the Jack-in-the-pulpit.
1997, Bown 2000), future research will likely identify many additional species of Cyclanthura as pollinators of this aroid complex.
Aroids are plants that have flowers wrapped around a central club-like spadix rather like a Mexican tortilla wrap.
Pothos or devil's ivy (Epipremnum aureum), whose leaves are heart-shaped and colored green and yellow or green and white, is the most widely grown aroid, possessing the status of America's favorite house plant.
This is the case for atmospheric species in the tillandsioids (Tomlinson, 1970), aroid vines such as Monstera tuberculata, which produces only saucer-shaped leaves throughout their life time (Lee & Richards, 1991), life-long carnivorous plants as descendents of species, in which carnivory was originally restricted to the early stages of ontogeny as in a few extant species (Barthlott et al.
IF I said I had a series of aroids, I would probably attract sympathetic glances from people who feared for my health.
He kept on researching on the various aspects of growing and breeding aglaonemas, even going to the United States to confer with other aroid enthusiasts in Florida.
Inflorescence odour of the foul-smelling aroid Helicodiceros muscivorus.
Preliminary identification of the residues based on their morphology suggests they are from the aroid, Colocasia esculenta (taro), but further analysis is required to confirm this identification.
Certainly the region encompassing the Malay Peninsula and Sumatra to the Phillipines along with Bismarck Archipelago is recognised as an important centre of aroid diversity (Croat 1979, Hay 1990).
Observations of aroid leaf and petiole anatomy were first compiled by van Tieghem (1866), de la Rue (1866), and Dalitzsch (1886).
1989) FAO/IBPGR Technical Guidelines for the Safe Movement of Edible Aroid Germplasm.