combat rations

(redirected from army rations)

combat rations

A generic term for military-issue food provided to soldiers on the front line of combat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since war conditions were already prevalent in Dacca cantonment, the city area was out of bounds for all and no one was allowed to purchase or consume any food items from the open market; Army rations were the only eatables allowed for everyone.
As part of a whole school interdisciplinary project, they were involved in a number of war themed activities including drilling, tasting army rations, exploring war wounds and investigating the impact of new technology.
Apart from soldiers stationed to guard it, a stray cat nibbling at discarded army rations seems to be the building's only inhabitant.
Jews, Deborah Dash Moore's book about Jews in the Army, Moore discusses the ways in which many Jewish soldiers, especially those raised in kosher homes, were compelled to modify their eating patterns in order to survive on army rations.
The container landed in a field of nearby Hill Farm, scattering its load of army rations including dried meals, sugar, salt, coffee, tea, chewing gum, cakes, energy bars, sausages, and plastic cutlery.
Then, instead of army rations for dinner, Bear offers them three rats, which they need to gut and cook first.
Instead of army rations for dinner, Bear o ers them three rats, which they need to gut and cook rst.
To stay alive, they must learn to navigate the terrain, build shelters, make fire and supplement their meagre army rations with whatever they can forage.
From "tea-vans" that followed the troops to the sharp end, through camp canteens where many a hungry soldier compensated for army rations with a supper of "fried egg and chips" to family shops and service clubs in leave centres, NAAFI was there.
After days of burning buildings, gun shots, tales of brutality, army rations and no running water, we headed back over the Macedonian border to its nearby capital Skopje for a night of rest.
He shared his army rations with the dog - named Peg after the pegasus flying horse emblem of the Paras - and told his family he hoped to bring her home after his tour of duty.
Summary: Children in Benghazi are not being sent to fight on the frontline, but they are helping Libya's revolution by cleaning streets, working as traffic cops and dishing up army rations to rebel soldiers.
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