argyrophilic grain disease

argyrophilic grain disease

A common (5% of all dementias) sporadic neurodegenerative disease (tauopathy) of old age which is characterised by argyrophilic grains (AGs—dendritic-derived appendages) seen by Golgi stains, and pre-tangle neurons in the limbic system, which contain hyperphosphorylated 4R tau. Hyperphosphorylated tau also accumulates in oligodendroglia and limbic astrocytes.
Clinical findings Largely depend on the extent of AGs and other associated tauopathies, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and synucleinopathies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following findings do not exclude the application of CARTS terminology for reasons that are further clarified below: the absence of morphologic HS (although frequently present), the absence of severe cerebral arteriolosclerosis (although frequently present), and/or the presence of other degenerative brain diseases, including [alpha]-synucleinopathies, and non-AD tauopathies, such as PART, progressive supranuclear palsy, and argyrophilic grain disease.
9,30) In other words, in the "oldest old" population, additional substrates of cognitive impairment must be considered (eg, vascular brain injury, HS and CARTS, argyrophilic grain disease, and PART).
No hereditary form of argyrophilic grain disease (AGD) has been described to date.