argument

(redirected from argue)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

argument

The reason(s) advanced for a particular thing’s existence.

argument

Medtalk The reason(s) advanced for a particular thing's existence. See Drug-baby argument, Health freedom argument, Particular person argument.
References in periodicals archive ?
Newdow argues that the Constitution prohibits the government from supporting any religion in public schools and elsewhere.
Most of the young writers and artists with a tinge of talent flee this city as if it were on fire." However, he does argue that Harris neglects a few "young writers and artists who stand clear of the mire he paints." Moreover, he takes exception to the inclusion of one artist in particular, playwright and sometime Esquire reviewer Meyer Levin, in Harris's "dismal gallery." Though Levin does not receive extensive critique from Harris, Harris does number him among those who are insufficiently concerned with proletarian struggle and too concerned with decadent aesthetics.
Instead, the NABSW, along with a number of black adoption agencies, argue that families of color are routinely passed over in favor of white families.
I argue that a new episode for culture production began following the Napoleon invasion of Egypt (1798-1801) and ended in the 1930s.
In the New York imaging system example already noted, what would happen if one argues in favor of image admissibility before an appellate court, and it is the very first New York case of its kind (a "case of first impression" in legal jargon)?
The centrality of affirmative action rebuts one other point made by those who now argue for returning to the Civil Rights Act strategy.
These lower-level leaders, argue the authors, have the credibility and respect that many senior leaders have squandered on ill-conceived mergers, miscalculated downsizings and failed re-engineering initiatives.
More broadly, it is not even correct to argue that CPI calculations are, or ever could be, a neat scientific process.
Patrick McCormick argues that religion belongs in our political discussions, but the religious values many politicians tout aren't shaping our public practices.
They argue that they tried to desegregate the county's schools and, in fact, satisfy the obligations of the landmark 1954 Brown v.
In the case of breast implants, a combination of an accumulation of anectodal reports of harm and alleged inconsistencies in manufacturers' data generation and collection have led FDA to demand safety data that would argue that the devices be permitted to remain on the market.
I imagine that every reader will be tempted to argue with one or another aspect of Hartman's two theses.