arcuate

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arcuate

 [ahr´ku-āt]
bent like a bow.

ar·cu·ate

(ar'kyū-āt),
Denoting a form that is arched or has the shape of a bow.
Synonym(s): arcate, arciform
[L. arcuatus, bowed]

arcuate

/ar·cu·ate/ (ahr´ku-āt) arc-shaped; arranged in arches.

arcuate

[är′kyo̅o̅·at]
Etymology: L, arcuatus, bowed
an arch or bow shape.

ar·cu·ate

(ahrk'yū-ăt)
Denoting a form that is arched or has the shape of a bow.
Synonym(s): arciform.
[L. arcuatus, bowed]

arcuate

Bowed, arched or curved. From the Latin arcus , a bow.

arcuate

curved in the form of a bow to the extent of a quadrant of a circle or more.

arcuate

arch-shaped

ar·cu·ate

(ahrk'yū-ăt)
Denoting a form that is arched or has the shape of a bow.
Synonym(s): arcate, arciform.
[L. arcuatus, bowed]

arcuate

bent like a bow.

arcuate line
part of the terminal line that marks the boundary of the pelvic inlet and which extends from the sacrum to the pubic brim.
arcuate vessels
the radicles of the interlobar arteries of the kidney found at the corticomedullary junction that give off the interlobular arteries.
References in periodicals archive ?
The arcuated throne canopy recurs in subsequent Italian art, verifying at second hand the continuing tradition of such an arrangement into the Renaissance era and beyond.
For additional references beyond those appearing in the notes that follow regarding arcuated throne canopies, see Deer, Dynastic Porphyry Tombs, 33 n.
Brown, "The Arcuated Lintel and Its Symbolic Interpretation in Late Antique Art," American Journal of Archaeology 46, no.
On the notion of a concave apse ceiling as substitute for an autonomous arcuated canopy, see above at notes 54, 55.
Popular in the Near East, the ancients regarded the Dioskouroi as intermediaries between gods and humankind and as agents of immortality; perhaps, therefore, the image of two piloi upon an altar is somehow related to the arcuated funereal canopies discussed earlier.
Part one addresses the Misericordia loggia proper and arcuated structures marking tombs and altars; part two will consider sheltered thrones and venues for humanitarian actions, as well as instances where an arched or domical construction served more than one of these functions.