arch

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arch

 [ahrch]
a structure of bowlike or curved outline.
abdominothoracic arch the lower boundary of the front of the thorax.
arch of aorta (aortic arch) the curving portion between the ascending aorta and the descending aorta, giving rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery.
aortic a's paired vessels arching from the ventral to the dorsal aorta through the branchial clefts of fishes and amniote embryos. In mammalian development, arch 1 largely disappears but may contribute to the maxillary and external carotid arteries; the dorsal portion of arch 2 persists and forms stems of the stapedial arteries; arch 3 joins the common to the internal carotid artery; arch 4 becomes the arch of the aorta and joins the aorta and subclavian artery; arch 5 disappears; and arch 6 forms the pulmonary arteries and, until birth, the ductus arteriosus.
branchial a's
four pairs of arched columns in the neck region of some aquatic vertebrates that bear the gills.
Branchial arches. From Dorland's, 2000.
pharyngeal arches.
dental arch either of the curving structures formed by the crowns of the upper and lower teeth in their normal positions (or by the residual ridge after loss of the teeth); they are called the inferior dental arch (see mandibular arch) and the superior dental arch (see maxillary arch).
a's of foot the longitudinal and transverse arches of the foot. The longitudinal arch comprises the medial arch or pars medialis, formed by the calcaneus, talus, and the navicular, cuneiform, and the first three tarsal bones; and the lateral arch or pars lateralis, formed by the calcaneus, the cuboid bone, and the lateral two metatarsal bones. The transverse arch comprises the navicular, cuneiform, cuboid, and five metatarsal bones.
lingual arch a wire appliance that conforms to the lingual aspect of the dental arch, used to secure movement of the teeth in orthodontic work.
mandibular arch
1. the first branchial arch, being the rudiment of the maxillary and mandibular regions; it also gives rise to the malleus and incus.
2. the dental arch formed by the teeth of the mandible; called also inferior dental arch.
maxillary arch the dental arch formed by the teeth of the maxilla; called also superior dental arch.
neural arch vertebral arch.
palatal arch the arch formed by the roof of the mouth from the teeth on one side to those on the other.
pharyngeal a's structures in the neck region of the human embryo that are analagous to the branchial arches in lower vertebrates; the four pairs of pharyngeal arches are mesenchymal and later cartilaginous structures that develop during the first two months of embryonic life and are separated by clefts (the pharyngeal grooves). As the fetus develops, the arches grow to form structures within the head and neck. Two of them grow together and enclose the cervical sinus, a cavity in the neck. Called also branchial arches.
pubic arch the arch formed by the conjoined rami of the ischium and pubis of the two sides of the body.
pulmonary a's the most caudal of the aortic arches; it becomes the pulmonary artery.
tendinous arch a linear thickening of fascia over some part of a muscle.
vertebral arch the dorsal bony arch of a vertebra, composed of the laminae and pedicles of a vertebra.
zygomatic arch the arch formed by the temporal process of the zygomatic bone and the zygomatic process of the temporal bone. See also anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.

arch

(arch), [TA]
Any structure resembling a bent bow or an arc. In anatomy, any vaulted or archlike structure. See: arcus.
Synonym(s): arcus [TA]
[thru O. Fr. fr. L. arcus, bow]

arch

(ärch)
n.
Anatomy An organ or structure having a curved or bowlike appearance, especially either of two arched sections of the bony structure of the foot.
A trial assessing IV amiodarone in decreased A Fib post open heart surgery
Conclusion A Fib occurred in 47% of placebo patients and 35% of amiodarone patients—ergo, 26% relative risk decrease

arch

(ahrch) [TA]
anatomy Any vaulted or archlike structure or arc.
Synonym(s): arcus [TA] .
[thru O. Fr. fr. L. arcus, bow]

arch

(ahrch) [TA]
Any structure resembling a bent bow or an arc. In anatomy, any vaulted or archlike structure.
Compare: dental arch
Synonym(s): arcus [TA] .
[thru O. Fr. fr. L. arcus, bow]
References in periodicals archive ?
This migrant invasion, continues Loret, "seems to be slowly returning [the southwestern United States] to the jurisdiction of Mexico without the firing of a single shot, nor requiring the least diplomatic action, by means of a steady, spontaneous, and uninterrupted occupation." The effects of Mexico's immigration invasion were even then visible in Los Angeles, which Loret archly referred to as "the second largest Mexican city in the world."
"Religious beliefs are absolute," said the posting to the archly realistic mailing list, "and as such, they are unfalsifiable." They are, according to the writer, therefore in the same category as beliefs about Santa Claus and preferences for boysenberry yogurt.
Wenegrat archly assumes that behavioral scientists can explain the whys and wherefores of human suffering better than the sufferers themselves.
I have a right to be blind sometimes', and archly putting his glass up to his right eye.
Archy gently but archly mocked the foibles of his time and place in conversations with an equally imaginary sidekick, a cat named mehitabel, who was supposedly descended from Cleopatra.
But I have just as strict a policy, in the other direction, on the word `inchoate.' My feeling is that inchoate is seriously, screamingly pretentious, whereas prelapsarian is more gothically, archly, wryly pretentious ....
Sometimes the student driver intoned archly: "All out for Kimmerville!" for benefit of Kimreys who never took a book home, walked off with every prize.
It's the giant gesture, the over-the-top expression, the exaggerated reaction, but all the time the performer is archly aware of what they're doing.
They hired a public-relations firm and begat what they archly dubbed "share" groups, Canada's answer to the corporate-sponsored "wise-use" movement south of the border.
Also, by talking to her, I learned that typed letters scanned better if they hadn't been written on (which made Dody's job easier) - and Chris also informed me rather archly that she knew enough about newspaper style to edit them herself once they were in the computer system.
The latest academic fad, Asserts that nothing's good or bad; It's relative we're archly told, (But so, of course, are hot and cold.) King Lear or Noddy?
In Worgitzky's 'I Quit' it is an absurd, 'blue-stockinged angel' who enables the school principal to maintain her multiple roles, and Wolf's splendid 'Revised Philosophy of a Tomcat' archly satirizes the technical jargon and the rationality fetish of the GDR's 'scientific-technological revolution'.