architecture


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architecture

Informatics
The form and manner in which a computer system and its components interact.

Vox populi
The shape or organisation of a structure or process.
References in periodicals archive ?
To avoid this pitfall, the architecture team must bridge the gap between the strategic modernization objectives and the tactical objectives that provide immediate value to customers.
The value of the split-path architecture can be seen in a typical environment in which data flows into an appliance- or controller-based system.
The first attribute, an SOA, is an architecture made up of components (software) and connections in which interoperability and location transparency are key attributes.
On opening our guide at its prominent question mark to learn more, a single short paragraph in bold welcomes us and identifies the role of the architecture we will encounter, ending with the words, "The renovated and expanded Museum was designed by Yoshio Taniguchi, whose uniquely elegant design enhances the presentation of the Museum's dynamic collection of modern and contemporary art." The completely different ambitions for the building and the art it exhibits could not be more clearly stated: The art is "dynamic," the building "elegant." The architecture is unlike the objects it houses, subservient to them, with its elegance somehow enhancing the experience of their dynamism.
#10 A financial customer, with 12.3 terabytes of user data, leverages Sun's EDW Reference Architecture and Sybase IQ.
Operating with a component-based architecture enables outsourcing of utility functions and maintenance of focus on core competencies and faster product development, for greater differentiation in the market.
The Wakesoft Architecture Platform is now available on the IBM WebSphere and BEA WebLogic platforms.
Areas of focus: Campus planning, Library planning and programming, architecture, interior architecture, graphic design
Among the writers in the literary canon who thought seriously about architecture, probably the one most likely to help us answer these questions is John Ruskin, an art critic of the Victorian era.
The title promises a theoretical orientation, but the editors of this useful volume of essays make clear that the emphasis is on the exploration of multifarious ways in which architecture and language come into contact in specific historical contexts.

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