architectural barrier


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architectural barrier

[är′kətek′chərəl]
any architectural feature of a home or a public building that limits the access and mobility of disabled persons. Wheelchair access, for example, requires ramped entryways, a minimum of 32-inch-wide doorways, a space of at least 60 × 60 inches for wheelchair turns, and counters no more than 26½ inches above floor level.
Any structure or design feature that makes a building inaccessible to a person with a disability—e.g., lack of ramps, narrow elevator doors, or environmental ‘cues’ that are not also written in Braille, such as public announcements or elevator buttons

architectural barrier

Public health Any structure or design feature that makes a building inaccessible to a person with a disability–eg, lack of ramps, narrow elevator doors. See Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.

architectural barrier

Any limitation in the design of facilities that restricts their access and use by persons with disabilities.
See also: barrier
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine the factors of architectural barriers, confirmatory factor analysis was used.
accessible to the disabled as part of the Architectural Barriers Act.
All existing facilities must have architectural barriers removed that would hinder access by the disabled if it is readily achievable to do so.
The security manager must consider the full range of potential countermeasures, including architectural barriers, intrusion detection, access control, and assessment subsystems, as well as procedure and personnel-intensive countermeasure combinations appropriate to each asset.
After finding many architectural barriers in the room, the customer filed the complaint with DOJ's Disability Rights Section.
Massachusetts, for example, says that among other things, the grants can be used on "housing rehabilitation or development, micro-enterprise or other business assistance, infrastructure, community/public facilities, public social services, planning, removal of architectural barriers to allow access by persons with disabilities, and downtown or area revitalization.
A failure in Eugene risked condemning a generation of disabled Americans to the unequal treatment imposed by architectural barriers.
Established under Section 44 of the Internal Revenue Code, the tax credit includes architectural modifications, purchase of adaptive equipment, removal of architectural barriers, and consulting fees.
While Longmore is an articulate and ardent spokesperson for people with disabilities, he does not share with readers a vision for the future, for a society in which all people have access not only in terms of architectural barriers, accommodations at work and on airplanes, and support programs, but in which they are truly integrated into the fabric of our culture and society.
Identifying architectural barriers is necessary and their removal is required when the program itself cannot be revised to provide accessibility.
Editorial includes information on facility compliance, the impact of Title II, the removal of architectural barriers, enforcement, implementation of Title III and its affect on commercial and industrial leases, liability, and conflicts between preservation and accessibility.
Efforts also are underway to consolidate and revise guidelines under ADA and the Architectural Barriers Act.

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