archetype

(redirected from archetypically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to archetypically: Archetypical problems

archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
propose only that the archetypically radiant state of Innocence
For example, the observation made in both papers of the role of the heavily tattooed Panglima Kumbang in the Tarakan conflict is significant, considering that the various semi-mythical panglima have appeared in "Dayak" conflicts, and archetypically in Sampit.
This is a point that will be more fully developed below, but note for instance that where a tortilla is always a basic meal, bread and water is a punishment, archetypically used to keep prisoners or misbehaving children in line.
125), a circumstance influenced by the "archetypically bureaucratic character of Australian curriculum and schooling," the practical effects of which have been "a lack of due regard for history, manifested as much as anything else in huge gaps and silences in the archive--in sharp contrast, for instance, with the North American scene" (p.
Memory: "Ancestral memory," notes Fox, "is enshrined archetypically in myth" that illuminates Art with a vitality that is absent, when burdened with the "weight of history" drawn from selective memory, which is often, "when not amnesia, mostly nostalgia ...
This archetypically neutral location serves as a counterpoint to Manifesta's edgy provenance to date.
Some of the most famous positions of writers who seem archetypically modern were positions already centuries old.
(12) While the bulk of such work focuses on Frenesi's betrayal of her family and compatriots, and a minority examines how the counterculturalists betray themselves in losing sight of their principles, none has yet addressed Rex's betrayal of Weed, which for Pynchon archetypically represents a common way in which people's movements undermine themselves.
Seen alongside 'Women of Jerusalem', the peaceful Mary Magdalene sleeping at the base of the cross ('Magdalene at the Base of the Cross') implies slumber is the only respite from sorrow -a sorrow archetypically embodied in the figure of Jesus' mother Mary.
Unlike Woolf, yet in common with many other auspicious women artists of the early twentieth century, Larsen's slim literary production would soon be relegated to the outermost fringes of literary history in the half century that followed, the author herself disappearing from the high-profile, mixed-race literary milieu her social ascent had given her access to, (3) vanishing into oblivion following accusations of plagiarism, (4) and returning to the archetypically feminine profession of nursing she had once been so happy to leave behind.
More recent ethnography has emphasized that, on the contrary, even the most archetypically capitalist institutions have a profoundly moral core, and not only in the sense that supply chains (Tsing 2013) and industrial labour regimes (Sanchez 2012; Rajak 2011) often depend on personalized relationships of the kind we usually associate with 'gift' economies.
But the wounds themselves are incidental to my more general point that the artist is archetypically someone whose sense of justice has been violated and whose urge is to rectify that violation by reinventing his world through his art.