archetype

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archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

/ar·che·type/ (ahr´kĕ-tīp) an ideal, original, or standard type or form.

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

archetype

[är′kətīp′]
Etymology: Gk, arche + typos, type
1 an original model or pattern from which a thing or group of things is made or evolves.
2 (in analytic psychology) an inherited primordial idea or mode of thought derived from the experiences of the human race and present in the subconscious of the individual in the form of drives, moods, and concepts. See also anima. archetypal, archetypic, archetypical, adj.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The suggestion that the figure of Jesus was the archetypical androgyne is the highlight of the relevance between Bakan and the androgyny hypothesis.
As for the spread of the stench from the army, the most important Israeli institution which was depicted for decades as being archetypical in terms of its sacrifices and "high morals," it is not that dissimilar from what is happening in other institutions and social sectors.
Paul and Minneapolis" in 1966) and an archetypical chapter in the story of the Catholic Church in the Upper Midwest.
It all begins in the gallery devoted to the archetypical Jewish story handed down through the generations: the saga of the deliverance of the Israelites from bondage in Egypt.
I'll always love music like that because I love to dance but I was the archetypical black jumper down over my hands/black Doc Martens indie kid.
The discovery that she has exchanged one set of checkpoints for another doesn't prevent Muna -- an archetypical maternal survivor straight out of Italian neorealism -- from buckling down to the business of survival in a culture whose traditional mistrust of dark-skinned foreigners is exacerbated by 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq.
The group performs in a humorous, idiosyncratic manner informed by archetypical male behaviours, particularly from the Blue Mountains region.
This section explores the conceptual and philosophical of Malaysia's version of PFI which is perceived as two different animals from the archetypical PFI implemented worldwide.
This archetypical staple of Japanese cuisine has been a popular fast-food item on the streets of Tokyo since the early nineteenth century, and a cornerstone of the domestic kitchen for centuries longer.
The design is based on archetypical images: town, house, chimney.
Redknapp is the archetypical old pro, unafraid to act decisively but canny enough to appreciate the importance of confidence.
Even in the presence of bilateral pars defects, considered archetypical of instability, studies using biplanar radiography (Pearcy and Shepherd 1985), steroephotogrammetry (Axelsonsson et al 2000) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (McGregor et al 2002) found no evidence of excess translation.