archetype

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Related to archetypal: Archetypal psychology

archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

/ar·che·type/ (ahr´kĕ-tīp) an ideal, original, or standard type or form.

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.

archetype

[är′kətīp′]
Etymology: Gk, arche + typos, type
1 an original model or pattern from which a thing or group of things is made or evolves.
2 (in analytic psychology) an inherited primordial idea or mode of thought derived from the experiences of the human race and present in the subconscious of the individual in the form of drives, moods, and concepts. See also anima. archetypal, archetypic, archetypical, adj.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ramsay takes the form of the archetypal image of the Great Mother" a personification of the feminine principle with its fundamental capacity to nourish or devour.
In an essay entitled "Blake's Treatment of the Archetype," Northrop Frye is influenced in his discussion of literary archetypes by Carl Jung's theory of archetypal forms, and he clearly states his position, "Blake's analysis of the individual shows a good many parallels with more recent analyses, especially those of Freud and Jung" (67).
And yet, though equality is the goal, archetypal woman's path is not direct.
Jung has been rightly pilloried for being too contextless, as if the archetypal images were immutable.
Catherine Fosl's Subversive Southerner traces the life story of Anne Braden, the archetypal "subversive Southerner," from her upbringing in Kentucky to her years in the desegregation struggle to her activism in the 1980s as a supporter of Jesse Jackson's Presidential campaigns.
Critics of Stanley Works, for example, noted that Benedict Arnold, that archetypal traitor, also fled from Connecticut to Bermuda during wartime.
Toward those he considered dogmatically correct, Gzowski was the archetypal avuncular uncle.
As the archetypal blond bimbo, Marie happily slaps on the orange, squeezes herself into PVC, and risks permanent injury by balancing on high heels whenever there are footballers around.
Archetypal machine politician Tom Pendergast, who ran Kansas City with a proverbial iron hand, aided Harry Truman's political rise at virtually every step.
The iconography of Mary Magdalene in Western art shows her as the first witness to the Resurrection (most frequently in the Noli Me Tangere--"Do not hold on to me," John 20:17-- scenes); as apostle to the apostles; as preacher-evangelist; and as archetypal penitential saint.
In his final chapter Steinmetz draws upon this "ethnology" to associate various elements of Native cultures with Christ and Christian symbols on an archetypal level.
He's a rider who has managed to capture the hearts of punters even more than one or two of his big-name colleagues and he's the archetypal jump jockey.