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arch

 [ahrch]
a structure of bowlike or curved outline.
abdominothoracic arch the lower boundary of the front of the thorax.
arch of aorta (aortic arch) the curving portion between the ascending aorta and the descending aorta, giving rise to the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery.
aortic a's paired vessels arching from the ventral to the dorsal aorta through the branchial clefts of fishes and amniote embryos. In mammalian development, arch 1 largely disappears but may contribute to the maxillary and external carotid arteries; the dorsal portion of arch 2 persists and forms stems of the stapedial arteries; arch 3 joins the common to the internal carotid artery; arch 4 becomes the arch of the aorta and joins the aorta and subclavian artery; arch 5 disappears; and arch 6 forms the pulmonary arteries and, until birth, the ductus arteriosus.
branchial a's
four pairs of arched columns in the neck region of some aquatic vertebrates that bear the gills.
Branchial arches. From Dorland's, 2000.
pharyngeal arches.
dental arch either of the curving structures formed by the crowns of the upper and lower teeth in their normal positions (or by the residual ridge after loss of the teeth); they are called the inferior dental arch (see mandibular arch) and the superior dental arch (see maxillary arch).
a's of foot the longitudinal and transverse arches of the foot. The longitudinal arch comprises the medial arch or pars medialis, formed by the calcaneus, talus, and the navicular, cuneiform, and the first three tarsal bones; and the lateral arch or pars lateralis, formed by the calcaneus, the cuboid bone, and the lateral two metatarsal bones. The transverse arch comprises the navicular, cuneiform, cuboid, and five metatarsal bones.
lingual arch a wire appliance that conforms to the lingual aspect of the dental arch, used to secure movement of the teeth in orthodontic work.
mandibular arch
1. the first branchial arch, being the rudiment of the maxillary and mandibular regions; it also gives rise to the malleus and incus.
2. the dental arch formed by the teeth of the mandible; called also inferior dental arch.
maxillary arch the dental arch formed by the teeth of the maxilla; called also superior dental arch.
neural arch vertebral arch.
palatal arch the arch formed by the roof of the mouth from the teeth on one side to those on the other.
pharyngeal a's structures in the neck region of the human embryo that are analagous to the branchial arches in lower vertebrates; the four pairs of pharyngeal arches are mesenchymal and later cartilaginous structures that develop during the first two months of embryonic life and are separated by clefts (the pharyngeal grooves). As the fetus develops, the arches grow to form structures within the head and neck. Two of them grow together and enclose the cervical sinus, a cavity in the neck. Called also branchial arches.
pubic arch the arch formed by the conjoined rami of the ischium and pubis of the two sides of the body.
pulmonary a's the most caudal of the aortic arches; it becomes the pulmonary artery.
tendinous arch a linear thickening of fascia over some part of a muscle.
vertebral arch the dorsal bony arch of a vertebra, composed of the laminae and pedicles of a vertebra.
zygomatic arch the arch formed by the temporal process of the zygomatic bone and the zygomatic process of the temporal bone. See also anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

arch

(arch), [TA]
Any structure resembling a bent bow or an arc. In anatomy, any vaulted or archlike structure. See: arcus.
Synonym(s): arcus [TA]
[thru O. Fr. fr. L. arcus, bow]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arch

(ärch)
n.
Anatomy An organ or structure having a curved or bowlike appearance, especially either of two arched sections of the bony structure of the foot.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A trial assessing IV amiodarone in decreased A Fib post open heart surgery
Conclusion A Fib occurred in 47% of placebo patients and 35% of amiodarone patients—ergo, 26% relative risk decrease
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

arch

(ahrch) [TA]
anatomy Any vaulted or archlike structure or arc.
Synonym(s): arcus [TA] .
[thru O. Fr. fr. L. arcus, bow]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arch

(ahrch) [TA]
Any structure resembling a bent bow or an arc. In anatomy, any vaulted or archlike structure.
Compare: dental arch
Synonym(s): arcus [TA] .
[thru O. Fr. fr. L. arcus, bow]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Study showed increase in inter-canine width, inter 1st premolar width, inter 2nd premolar width and inter molar width in both maxillary and mandibular arches, with more expansion in premolar area.
"We've manufactured inflatable arches and inflatable buoys for Speedo.
The city council's licensing board said the decision to cut The Arches' hours came after evidence of "200 drug-related incidents detailed, as well as numerous call-outs to the ambulance service".
who lives near Slaley, had the honour of completing the lime mortar work on the Gothic style arches. Mr Roddam has life-long associations with the site and remembers the saw mill that was once there long after the lead smelting mill closed.
By the help of Cunningham's Manual of Practical Anatomy, the different palmar arches were exposed.
In the approved design, the arches come up to the bottom of the travel deck but do not rise above it.
In 1947, Hays Nance (11) taught us that there is a difference between the space occupied by the deciduous canines and molars in both arches and that needed by the succedaneous permanent canines and premolars.
Granite masonry arches flanking the Bronx side of the bridge need to be repointed and patched.
(1) Abnormalities derived from the third and fourth arches are quite uncommon--each less than 5% of the total.
Figer used the Hubble Space Telescope to determine the weight of hundreds of stars in the Arches cluster.
Inside the great vaulted space, the converging arches lead the eye to the central altar, brilliantly illuminated by shafts of direct sunlight--a literal and spiritual beacon in the surrounding gloom.