arbovirus

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Related to arboviral: Arboviral encephalitides

arbovirus

 [ahr´bo-vi″rus]
a term used by epidemiologists to refer to any of numerous viruses that replicate in blood-feeding arthropods such as mosquitoes and ticks and are transmitted to humans by biting. adj., adj arbovi´ral.

ar·bo·vi·rus

(ar'bō-vī'rŭs),
A name for a large, heterogeneous group of RNA viruses. There are more than 500 species, which are distributed among several families (Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Arenaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Reoviridae), and have been recovered from arthropods, bats, and rodents; most, but not all, are arthropod borne. These taxonomically diverse animal viruses are unified by an epidemiologic concept, that is, transmission between vertebrate hosts by blood-feeding (hematophagous) arthropod vectors (for example, mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges). Although about 100 species can infect humans, in most instances diseases produced by these viruses are of a mild nature and difficult to distinguish from illnesses caused by viruses of other taxonomic groups. Apparent infections may be separated into several clinical syndromes: undifferentiated-type fevers (systemic febrile disease), hepatitis, hemorrhagic fevers, and encephalitides.
[ar, arthropod, + bo, borne, + virus]

arbovirus

(är′bə-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a large group of RNA viruses that are transmitted by arthropods, such as mosquitoes and ticks, and include the causative agents of encephalitis, yellow fever, and dengue.

ar′bo·vi′ral adj.
ar′bo·vi·rol′o·gy (är′bō-vĭ-rŏl′ə-jē) n.

arbovirus

A large, heterogeneous group of single-stranded RNA viruses with an envelope surrounding the capsid, which are so named as most are transmitted by the saliva of haematophagous arthropod bites, i.e., are arthropod-borne.
 
Clinical findings
Most arboviral infections are mild, but may include haemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, systemic fever complex and hepatitis.
 
Vectors
Mosquitoes, sandflies, ticks.
 
Families
Arenavirus, Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, Reoviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Toagaviridae.

arbovirus

Virology A large, heterogeneous group of single stranded RNA viruses with an envelope surrounding the capsid, which are so named as most are transmitted by arthropod bites, ie are ARthropod-BOrne Vectors Mosquitoes, sandflies, ticks Clinical Most arboviral infections are mild; clinical syndromes include hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, systemic fever complex, hepatitis Families Arenavirus, Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, Reoviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Toagaviridae See California encephalitis, Eastern equine encephalitis, St Louis encephalitis, Yellow fever, Western equine encephalitis.

ar·bo·vi·rus

(ahr'bō-vī'rŭs)
A large, heterogeneous group of RNA viruses. There are more than 500 species, which have been recovered from arthropods, bats, and rodents. These taxonomically diverse viruses are unified by an epidemiologic concept, i.e., transmission between vertebrate hosts by blood-feeding arthropod vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges. In most instances diseases produced by these viruses are mild and difficult to distinguish from illnesses caused by viruses of other taxonomic groups. Infections may be separated into several clinical syndromes: undifferentiated type fevers (systemic febrile disease), hepatitis, hemorrhagic fevers, and encephalitides.
[ar, arthropod, + bo, borne, + virus]

arbovirus

Any of the hundred or so viruses transmitted by an arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, bugs, lice, ticks and mites. The group includes viruses that cause various forms of ENCEPHALITIS, haemorrhagic fevers, YELLOW FEVER, DENGUE, Kyasanur Forest disease, Rift Valley fever and Chikungunya Forest fever.

arbovirus

any virus that is ARTHROPOD-borne, e.g. the yellow-fever virus carried by the mosquito Aedes aegypti.
References in periodicals archive ?
As in previous years, WNV was the most common cause of neuroinvasive arboviral disease in the United States, accounting for 89% of reported neuroinvasive disease cases.
Emergence of Zika virus in Latin America has further complicated diagnosis of arboviral infections, and simultaneous co-infections with all 3 arboviruses have been reported (13).
During 2006-2014, a total of 36,150 suspected cases of arboviral infections were initially screened for CHIKV by RT-PCR and IgM/IgG ELISA (using the first blood sample).
Arboviral disease can cause substantial morbidity and mortality in the United States.
Seroprevalence and distribution of arboviral infections among rural Kenyan adults: a cross-sectional study.
As in previous years, in 2016, WNV remained the most common cause of neuroinvasive arboviral disease in the continental United States, accounting for 95% of reported neuroinvasive disease cases.
The incidence data most useful in signaling underlying ecosystem processes relate to vector-mediated diseases (e.g., arboviral illnesses), direct zoonoses (e.g., hantaviruses), and infections that appear to transcend simple transmission categories [e.g., viruses that were zoonotic but "transformed" to direct anthroponoses, such as SARS (severe acute respiratory virus) and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)].
vexans, and Anopheles crucians contributed to the arboviral activity.
No evidence of arboviral seroconversion in the Guam rail or chicken sample populations was observed in this study, and no such evidence has been reported on Guam or Rota.
The Powassan virus is the least common cause of arboviral encephalitis in North America, whereas West Nile virus is the most common.
The most lethal pediatric neuroinvasive arboviral disease is eastern equine encephalitis virus infection, with a 38% mortality rate.
La Crosse virus (LACV) is the most common cause of pediatric arthropod-borne viral (arboviral) encephalitis in the United States (1).