arachnidism

arachnidism

 [ah-rak´nĭ-dizm]
poisoning from a spider bite.

a·rach·nid·ism

(ă-rak'ni-dizm),
Systemic poisoning following the bite of a spider (especially the black widow).
Intoxication by arachnid venom, especially from a black widow spider bite

arachnidism

Entomology Intoxication by arachnid venom, especially from a black widow spider bite. See Necrotizing arachnidism.

a·rach·nid·ism

(ă-rak'ni-dizm)
Systemic poisoning following the bite of a venomous spider (especially the black widow).

Arachnidism

Poisoning resulting from the bite or sting of an arachnid.
Mentioned in: Bites and Stings
References in periodicals archive ?
Sporotrichosis mimicking necrotising arachnidism. 1999:Med J Aust.
Bites of brown recluse spiders and suspected necrotic arachnidism. New England Journal of Medicine, 352(7), 700-707.
If in the majority of the cases of arachnidism, the spider is not identified, it has been currently seen that a greater number of people develop necrotic ulcers probably due to the great variety of species found distributed throughout the Mexican Republic or even the introduction of dangerous species such as L.
The article "Clinical Features Help Diagnose Loxosceles Bites" was good, except for the statement that Loxosceles is probably the only important cause of necrotic arachnidism in the country (May 15, 2004, p.
The article "Treatment Varies for Severe Loxosceles Spider Bite" was good, except for the statement that Loxosceles is probably the only important cause of necrotic arachnidism in the country (May 1, 2004, p.
Brown recluse spider bites: A common cause of necrotic arachnidism. Am J Emerg Med 1989;7:309-12.
Loxosceles spider venom induces the production of alpha and beta chemokines: implications for the pathogenesis of dermonecrotic arachnidism. Inflammation 1999; 23: 207-15.
poison-control centers during 1994; and emphasizes the need for physicians in the northwestern United States to consider this species as a cause of toxic arachnidism.
As reported in the majority of the publications, the current statistics do not reveal the identification of the arthropod, which lacks for registering the real incidence of lesions by necrotic arachnidism. The patient's evolution coincides with that described by several authors in reference to the local, systemic and mixed presentations caused by the bites, registering two as evolving satisfactorily, one with neurological sequelae and one patient dying.